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Stop Their World Spinning

November 1, 2014
Stop Their World Spinning

Against a pervasive American sports culture, author Steve Allmond pits a devastating critique of the savage violence – and staggering toll in injuries and deaths – of football.

Title Menu: A list of great political books that doesn’t include What It Takes by Richard Ben Cramer

November 1, 2014
Title Menu: A list of great political books that doesn’t include <em>What It Takes</em> by Richard Ben Cramer

Just in time for the November midterm elections, we do what doubters said couldn’t be done: we present you with a list of ten great political books that doesn’t include Richard Ben Cramer’s What It Takes.

The Attempt to See

November 1, 2014
The Attempt to See

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Marilynne Robinson returns to small-town Iowa in this new novel full of deceptive calms and clear mastery.

More Faith, Better Grounded

November 1, 2014
More Faith, Better Grounded

A reissue of James Agee’s letters to Father Flye give a picture of the writer’s naked ambition, excoriating self-hatred, and unrefined genius. But it also raises the question: Do we remember Agee more for what he wrote or what his addictions prevented him from writing?

It’s a Mystery: “Forgive your enemies but never forget their names”

November 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “Forgive your enemies but never forget their names”

Felix Francis continues to artfully follow in his late father’s footsteps with his newest thriller, Dick Francis’s Damage. The Button Man, Mark Pryor’s fourth Hugo Marston novel, is a prequel that adds a fascinating dimension to the highly charismatic protagonist of this splendid series.

From the Archives: Why James Agee Still Matters

November 1, 2014
From the Archives: Why James Agee Still Matters

John Updike once affably damned James Agee as a wasted talent who failed to cultivate his craft. Liza Birnbaum replies with a defense of the glories of Agee’s ragged, heartfelt work.

Title Menu: 8 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Classics Hollywood Should Ignore

October 1, 2014
Title Menu: 8 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Classics Hollywood Should Ignore

As Hollywood looks to science fiction and fantasy novels for the ‘source material’ of its newest CGI spectaculars, Justin Hickey picks ten sci-fi/fantasy books he hopes the studios never find and ruin …

Grosz Anatomy

October 1, 2014
Grosz Anatomy

In his latest collection of essays, Theater of Cruelty, Ian Buruma launches a series of expert investigations into the springs of cruelty and the perils of victomhood.

Broken

October 1, 2014
Broken

The wide-ranging themes of this wrenching novel are unified by imagery that links its heroine to an unexpected community of the traumatized living dead.

Terminal Lost and Found

October 1, 2014
Terminal Lost and Found

Martin Amis’ new novel not only delves into the souls of a small group of characters involved in the running of concentration camp – it also interrogates the very nature of Holocaust fiction. Jack Hanson reads the latest from the author of Time’s Arrow.

Post Re-Bop

October 1, 2014
Post Re-Bop

James Ellroy begins a second L.A. Quartet with his new novel Perfidia. But does it harness the demonic madness and stylistic panache of the author’s earlier works of historical crime fiction?

Coalition of the Chilling

October 1, 2014
Coalition of the Chilling

A British historian’s richly-sourced accounting of Molotov-Ribbentrop offers fresh insights into this Nazi-Soviet pact of “non-aggression.”

John Domini’s Transformations

October 1, 2014
John Domini’s Transformations

With literary criticism disappearing as a popular artform, we increasingly look to the book reviewer to do the critic’s work. A new collection by John Domini offers an example of reviews that transcend their form to provide analysis alongside mere evaluation.

It’s a Mystery: “Morality is like an industry, you use what you have”

October 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Morality is like an industry, you use what you have”

Sophie Hannah revives Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot with panache in The Monogram Murders, and Joe Gannon’s debut thriller Night of the Jaguar is a tightly wound, gut-wrenching read.

From the Archives: As If In a Glorious Hell

October 1, 2014
ty

In her debut collection of stories, Tiphanie Yanique attempts to capture in prose the complexities of modern-day life and racial identity in a Caribbean behind the tourism ads.

Peer Review: Elena Ferrante’s Hunger, Rebellion, and Rage

September 1, 2014
Peer Review: Elena Ferrante’s Hunger, Rebellion, and Rage

The critical consensus around reclusive Italian novelist Elena Ferrante is enough to make you suspect collusion – but to what end? and at what cost? Rohan Maitzen reviews the reviewers.

Words Plucked from Our Tongues

September 1, 2014
Words Plucked from Our Tongues

Can Joseph Boyden’s The Orenda heal Canada’s colonial relationship with its First Nations? Why should we expect literature to succeed where our leaders have failed?

All Manner of Damned-Fool-Bravery

September 1, 2014
All Manner of Damned-Fool-Bravery

A disaffected British colonial officer with a yearning for heroism is relegated to a doomed imperial outpost where he meets a native boy with a yearning for heroes – and from this unlikely pairing, Nick Harkaway’s Tigerman weaves its fantastic, moving story.

A Kind of Humanity: Herzog at 50

September 1, 2014
A Kind of Humanity: <em>Herzog</em> at 50

It’s been half a century since the appearance of Saul Bellow’s seminal novel Herzog – Jack Hanson revisits the work to see how Bellow’s various machinations have held up over time.

Call It His Soul

September 1, 2014
Call It His Soul

Christopher Beha’s new novel Arts and Entertainments aims to be that weirdest of all things: a serious, even elegant, book about … reality television. As our reviewer reports, the oddity is that it was even attempted, and the wonder is that it succeeds so well.

A Walker in the City

September 1, 2014
A Walker in the City

In the world of Julie Hayden’s stories, the contingency of all experience, let alone of literary creation and reputation, is inescapable.

It’s a Mystery: “Fear is a contagious disease”

September 1, 2014
Stitched Panorama

A tightly drawn disturbing novel, The Frozen Dead is Bernard Minier’s auspicious debut. The Long Way Home is the tenth in Louise Penny’s celebrated Armand Gamache series.

Book Review: The Dog

August 2, 2014
the dog cover

A fascinating debut collection of short stories set in modern China

The Very Edge of Fiction

August 1, 2014
The Very Edge of Fiction

Ben Lerner has followed his breakout novel Leaving the Atocha Station with a metafictional tale of a second-time novelist trying to throw a book together. Is it more than a game?

An Ignorant Highbrow

August 1, 2014
An Ignorant Highbrow

If you think distinctions between ‘high’ and ‘low’ art are stuffy Victorian relics, our beleagured Stephen Akey says, you’re just not paying enough attention. So are you a highbrow? And should you be? And should everybody be?

Grand Affiliations

August 1, 2014
Grand Affiliations

Metaphor: a tool for poets and rhetoricians, but also, perhaps, the way that people connect to the world at large. Lianne Habinek reviews a gamesome new study by the great literary critic Denis Donoghue.

Socrates Offside

August 1, 2014
Socrates Offside

What place do deep questions about the meaning of life have in our technological age? Is philosophy more important than ever?

A Picture Book

August 1, 2014
A Picture Book

Cover art from Omni, the new-age science mag of yore, is now a coffee table book: Giger, Frazetta, and Grant Wood are all here, but something crucial has been left out.

It’s a Mystery: “My world is a jungle of threats”

August 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “My world is a jungle of threats”

A Colder War is the latest from Charles Cumming, one of the best at depicting the frail and brutal world of spydom. Neely Tucker’s The Ways of the Dead marks the debut of what promises to be a first-rate series.

To Brave the Swollen Waters

August 1, 2014
To Brave the Swollen Waters

Powerful South Korean writer Kyung-sook Shin’s second novel to be translated into English tells a touchingly human tale set in a world which, for most of her Western readers, could scarcely be more alien.

Dream-to-Desk

July 1, 2014
Dream-to-Desk

Michael Cunningham’s beautiful new novel The Snow Queen follows the wisdom of fairy tales: its revelations occur at dusk, because the hour of despair is the most fertile of the day.

Beethoven in the Soul

July 1, 2014
Beethoven in the Soul

Over time, the books of our youth make way for titles better suited to the grown-up readers we have become. But not all of them: YA or not, some books — such as K. M. Peyton’s Pennington trilogy — deserve a lasting place on our shelves.

Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

July 1, 2014
Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

It’s summer at last, and you won’t find any relief from the heat in our editors’ round-up of the hottest books they know.

Wilson 2.0

July 1, 2014
Wilson 2.0

Daniel Wilson’s first book, Robopocalypse was a straightforward adventure story about robots rising up against their human makers. His new book takes that simple premise and expands on it in complex and timely ways.

Passing Roncesvalles Again

July 1, 2014
Passing Roncesvalles Again

The new Scribner “Hemingway Library” edition of The Sun Also Rises offers annotations, rough drafts, and alternate line-edits – but how much light does it shed on its “near-perfect work of fiction”?

It’s a Mystery: “It’s hard to be murdered for any reason”

July 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “It’s hard to be murdered for any reason”

Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane, those supersmart, sophisticated sleuths, are back in The Late Scholar, a savvy new detective story by Jill Paton Walsh.

Their Bloody Instruments

July 1, 2014
Their Bloody Instruments

A ticking clock hangs ominously over every page of Craig DiLouie’s genuinely creepy new horror novel, filled with beings who aren’t quite zombies and not quite vampires. Our resident horror maven Deirdre Crimmins tells us all about it.

Title Menu: 8 More George Eliot Novels

June 1, 2014
Title Menu: 8 More George Eliot Novels

Middlemarch is all the rage now – as it should be! But what if you’ve already read not just George Eliot’s masterpiece but all of her novels? Do not despair: these eight books will bring you close to her in spirit.

The Sun Was Bad

June 1, 2014
The Sun Was Bad

Rusty Barnes’ debut novel Reckoning is both a hardbitten Appalachia noir and tender coming of age tale, both real art and real fun.

Coral Waxwork Classic

June 1, 2014
Coral Waxwork Classic

Rjurik Davidson’s stunning debut – an epic of espionage, magic, and beasts migrated out of mythology – isn’t the sixth in a series, or the tenth, or the fifteenth; it’s that rare thing in the genre: a stand-alone novel

June 2014 Issue

June 1, 2014
June 2014 Issue

For a little over two years, shortly before she died, short story master Katherine Mansfield wrote a weekly book review column. Those pieces not only shed light on Mansfield’s particular slant of genius, but have much to say about the embattled art of reviewing.

The 5 Commandments

June 1, 2014
The 5 Commandments

Major Kolt “Racer” Raynor doesn’t salute the U.S. flag – it salutes him. He punches bad guys so hard their grandkids are born with bruises. He once garrotted a terrorist using a string made from his own eyelashes. He stars in Dalton Fury’s new action novel – and if you don’t read the book, he’ll know.

Dervishes and Gypsies

June 1, 2014
Dervishes and Gypsies

Legendary Indian author Saadat Hasan Manto’s choicest short stories – depicting a teeming Bombay that’s both long-vanished and eternal – receive an attractive new paperback edition from Vintage International

It’s a Mystery: “Destiny is invincible; it always triumphs in the end”

June 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Destiny is invincible; it always triumphs in the end”

Our mystery columnist looks at a highly anticipated debut, The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair by Joel Dicker, as well as the second novel in Jonathan Holt’s brilliant Carnivia trilogy, The Abduction.

The Important Difference

May 1, 2014
The Important Difference

Is it really the immigrant writer’s job to represent third-world suffering for the sake of first-world catharsis? In All Our Names, Dinaw Mengestu resists the pressure to substitute autoethnography for art.

Title Menu: 8 books where bad decisions make good protagonists

May 1, 2014
Title Menu: 8 books where bad decisions make good protagonists

Characters never go wrong when their poor life choices make for fascinating reading. Kathleen Rooney supplies us with eight unmissable examples.

The Selves in Ourself

May 1, 2014
The Selves in Ourself

In Valeria Luiselli’s debut novel, a young Mexican woman imagines the real life of a long-dead man whose writings she has forged in the voice of a famous American poet. Then things get complicated.

So Why Write?

May 1, 2014
So Why Write?

As the world’s supply of writers outpaces the world’s demand for their books, the financial returns for writing have fallen to laughable levels. Then why keep doing it? Paul Griffin explores the problem of writing and money.

It’s a Mystery: “The past lies like a nightmare upon the present”

May 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “The past lies like a nightmare upon the present”

A troika of mysteries—one a gripping debut, Precious Thing by Colette McBeth, the others superb new novels from two very special authors: Peter Robinson returns with Children of the Revolution and Donna Leon is back with By Its Cover.

The Ogre’s Guests

April 1, 2014
The Ogre’s Guests

In his latest novel In Paradise Peter Matthiessen dramatizes a collision between the thoughtful philosophy of Zen and the worst of the 20th Century’s horrors.

The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit

April 1, 2014
The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit

William S. Burroughs’s notorious Cut-up Trilogy was his fiercest broadside against what he felt was the tyranny of linear thought. Steve Danziger delves into their Word Hoard.

In the Land of the Free Brain

April 1, 2014
In the Land of the Free Brain

“Your field is the mind, mine is the brain – will the twain ever meet?” Master novelist E. L. Doctorow’s latest deals with the traumas of duality.

It’s a Mystery: “Memory: that place where personal recollections collide with history”

April 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Memory: that place where personal recollections collide with history”

The Cairo Affair is an elegant new espionage thriller from the highly accomplished Olen Steinhauer. And in The Revenant of Thraxton Hall, Vaughn Entwistle teams Arthur Conan Doyle with Oscar Wilde – what could be better?

Thingamajig Unbound

March 1, 2014
Thingamajig Unbound

B. J. Novak, the gamine and unassuming star of the American version of The Office, has written a collection of short stories, and that collection, remarkably, got published. Justin Hickey decides to judge it on its merits.

Come, O, Come to Raintree County

March 1, 2014
Come, O, Come to Raintree County

Raintree County may be the greatest American novel nobody has ever read. When Michael Johnson pulled it off his shelf, he was instantly hooked: maybe it’s time for a revival.

The Idea of Kenya

March 1, 2014
The Idea of Kenya

A dazzling, kaleidescopic debut novel journeys through Kenya’s fraught post-colonial history while unpacking the tangled question of what it means to be a Kenyan.

A Place Out of a Story Book

March 1, 2014
A Place Out of a Story Book

A close reading of Elisabeth de Waal’s The Exiles Return reminds us that the dream of every returning exile is to savor not only a lost land but a lost time.

It’s a Mystery: “The past lies in wait to ambush the present”

March 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “The past lies in wait to ambush the present”

A veteran master of suspense, Gerald Seymour enhances his track record with The Dealer and the Dead. Scott O’Connor’s Half World is a chilling fictional take on a secret CIA mind control program activated in the middle of the last century.

Second Glance: The Wit and Woe of Mavis Gallant

February 18, 2014
collectedmavis

We mourn the death of the great Canadian short story writer Mavis Gallant and are re-running Karen Vanuska’s moving appreciation from 2009 in tribute.

Lost in Eliot

February 1, 2014
Lost in Eliot

The books we reread say a lot about who we are or who we hope to be. They also shape us, as Rebecca Mead discovers in exploring her own long relationship with George Eliot’s Middlemarch.

Bigger with More and More

February 1, 2014
Bigger with More and More

Spike Jonze is the most mainstream of indie directors — or the most indie of mainstream directors — and his newest film Her is a triumph of quirky charm and visionary depth. Matt Sadler reviews.

Title Menu: Twoo Wuv

February 1, 2014
Title Menu: Twoo Wuv

February would be unremittingly bleak if it weren’t for the excuse it gives us to ponder the meaning of love, that many-splendored thing. Our editors offer up their favorite literary treatments.

It’s a Mystery: “Always take the favor over money”

February 1, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Always take the favor over money”

Martha Grimes’ The Way of All Fish is a delectable satire set in the cutthroat world of New York publishing. Max Kinnings’ Baptism is a taut thriller of unbridled terror in the London subway.

What Passes for Hope

January 1, 2014
What Passes for Hope

One could argue, from the evidence of cable TV ratings, that we’ve entered the age of the anti-hero. But why are they so popular? Adam Sternbergh’s debut novel provides some unexpected answers.

No Picnic

January 1, 2014
No Picnic

To literary scholar Laura Frost, the great 20th century modernists created readerly pleasures not through familiar comforts but by transforming difficulty and strangeness into something exciting and new. Daniel Green tests the theory.

Muses Far From Home

January 1, 2014
Muses Far From Home

Romance, nostalgia and beguiling delusions are hallmarks of Lara Vapnyar’s novels, including her sinuous newest, The Scent of Pine

It’s a Mystery: “There’s no trap so deadly as the trap you set for yourself”

January 1, 2014
Mayhem 72 dpi copy

Two fine, first-rate thrillers usher in the New Year. One centers on a major drug bust in a cutting edge contemporary setting, the other tackles one of the most baffling and notorious crime sprees of the Victorian era.

Desperately Seeking Solzhenitsyn

December 1, 2013
Desperately Seeking Solzhenitsyn

Every correspondent in Moscow wanted to be the first to find Solzhenitsyn after he won the Nobel Prize in 1970. Michael Johson had that honor – but the great Russian writer wasn’t altogether pleased so see him.

Bridget of Sighs

December 1, 2013
Bridget of Sighs

The new Bridget Jones novel will make you laugh and cry — but it might also make you fret, as it continues the series’ ongoing celebration of incompetence. Is blue soup really the best we can hope for, or the most we should strive for?

Second Glance: Wretched Creatures

December 1, 2013
Second Glance: Wretched Creatures

John Ford’s story of star-crossed lovers is bloodier than Shakespeare’s and more heart-wrenching, too, for it’s a tragedy of childhood, of innocence lost.

Wine and Bellow: An Interview with Charles Blackstone

December 1, 2013
blackstonec

Charles Blackstone, author of the novel Vintage Attraction and managing editor at Bookslut, speaks with Kevin Frazier about Chicago literature, online publishing, and being the spouse of a sommelier

Bonfire of the Inanities

November 1, 2013
Bonfire of the Inanities

A murder, a trip to the dump, and oh yah – September 11. That wacky Thomas Pynchon is at it again!

Second Glance: No Lesser Crime

November 1, 2013
Second Glance: No Lesser Crime

“The Moonstone will have its vengeance on you and yours!” Those fateful words propel us into one of the first and best of modern English detective novels — still sensational after all these years.

Eternal Blazon

November 1, 2013
Eternal Blazon

Led on by a “shared obsession,” a philosopher and a psycyhoanalyst have teamed up to offer their interpretation of Hamlet. With the ghosts of countless critics looming before them, how has this pair fared?

What Does an African Woman Want in America?

November 1, 2013
What Does an African Woman Want in America?

Chimananda Ngozi Adichie’s expansive novel Americanah centers on a Nigerian woman’s immigration to the United States and eventual return to Nigeria. Orem Ochiel explores what her story says about complex, often traumatic experience of being black and African in the West.

Spray-Paint It Black

November 1, 2013
Spray-Paint It Black

Vintage records, black dogs, and lost souls fill Dead Set, a teen novel for readers (of all ages) who are sick of half-hearted Hunger Games clones.

The Art of Losing

November 1, 2013
The Art of Losing

A light mantle of frost settles over the crowded events of Jumpha Lahiri’s new novel, which is “about” loss in the way that Anna Karenina is “about” love

It’s a Mystery: “A man who lets guilt ruin pleasure is the pincushion of fate”

November 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery:  “A man who lets guilt ruin pleasure is the pincushion of fate”

The splendid Tatiana is Martin Cruz Smith’s eighth Arkady Renko novel, while Sins of the Flesh is the fifth thriller to feature Colleen McCullough’s offbeat detective Carmine Delmonico.

In Search of Lost Tirades

October 1, 2013
In Search of Lost Tirades

Jonathan Franzen has translated and annotated a collection of essays by Karl Kraus, the Austrian polemicist known as the Great Hater and one of the signal curmudgeonly influences behind Franzen’s fiction.

October 2013 Issue

October 1, 2013
October 2013 Issue

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A Chip off the Old Bwana

October 1, 2013
A Chip off the Old Bwana

How do you follow up on creating Tarzan of the Apes? You give the Ape-Man a son, stranding him in the jungle, and sending him out on hair-raising adventures of his own. And if you’re lucky, a legendary comic book artist will come along and draw it all.

An Inglorious Life

October 1, 2013
An Inglorious Life

Elizabeth Gilbert’s ambitious new novel imagines the life of a 19th-century woman botanist, as insightful as Darwin but lost to history. It’s an interesting project, and a worthy one, but does the novel live up to its premise?

Show Me the Body

October 1, 2013
Show Me the Body

Throughout its history, humankind has been both terrified by and obsessed with monsters – hence the booming ‘cryptid’ industry, traversing the globe in search of legendary beasts like Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster. A new book looks at the science and psychology behind our modern bogeymen.

Beyond Thought

October 1, 2013
Beyond Thought

The style of Clarice Lispector’s unconventional and uneasy fiction was driven by both social anxiety and physical pain. How did this transubstantiation take place?

Somebody Ate Her Gerbil

October 1, 2013
Somebody Ate Her Gerbil

Fearless reporter Renata Adler’s novel “Speedboat” has been stirring debate and controversy since it was published in 1976; now, in a new reprint from the New York Review of Books, it retains its power to shock, subvert, and just maybe seduce.

It’s a Mystery: “It is always easier to ask for forgiveness than ask for permission”

October 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “It is always easier to ask for forgiveness than ask for permission”

Never Go Back, Lee Child’s 18th Jack Reacher adventure, is a winner; plus, the second in a nifty new series, Mortal Bonds by Michael Sears, redefines “follow the money.”

Joseph and his Brothers

September 1, 2013
Joseph and his Brothers

To many the scriptural story of Joseph is ancient and arcane. But its exploration into divine and authorial omniscience make it seem powerfully contemporary.

Hot and Cold

September 1, 2013
Hot and Cold

Distance is complicated: it measures intimacy, but in unpredictable ways. Rebecca Solnit’s evocative new book explores the meaning of distance and closeness.

September 2013 Issue

September 1, 2013
September 2013 Issue

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The Heavy Blanks: The Journals of Elizabeth Smart

September 1, 2013
The Heavy Blanks: The Journals of Elizabeth Smart

An aspiring young writer encounters the journals of legendary Canadian novelist Elizabeth Smart, whose virtuoso novella By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept gives no hint of her struggles with her own writing

Reading Eric Blair

September 1, 2013
Reading Eric Blair

Today George Orwell is a buzzword; what can his collected letters tell us about the man himself? G. Robert Ogilvy looks for the human being beneath the persona.

A Prose Piece for Your Gaps: Robert Walser’s Short Works

September 1, 2013
A Prose Piece for Your Gaps: Robert Walser’s Short Works

A newly translated selection of occasional prose by Robert Walser demonstrates the Swiss eccentric’s range of manic humor and Romantic melancholy

It’s a Mystery: “Only dead men and idiots believe in coincidence”

September 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “Only dead men and idiots believe in coincidence”

Two special thrillers, The Edge of Normal by Carla Norton and Alex by Pierre Lemaitre: They “star” a duo of sexual predators—each a particularly nasty piece of work that makes for heart stopping suspense.

From the Archives: Elizabeth Smart, Queen of Sheba

September 1, 2013
by-grand-central-e-smart

A wild fever-dream of a book, By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept careers between thrilling emotion and absurd histrionics.

Missed Connections

August 1, 2013
Missed Connections

Is David Rakoff’s novel-in-verse either worthy verse or a worthy novel? Does he pull off a high-wire act, as so many critics have concluded, or is it all a grand illusion?

Behold the Man

August 1, 2013
Behold the Man

The meek and peaceful Jesus has become the standard Christian image of the Messiah. Religious scholar Reza Aslan’s controversial new book shatters that image and replaces it with something very different: a violent revolutionary who came not to bring peace but a sword.

In Prague on an Errand

August 1, 2013
In Prague on an Errand

In Caleb Crain’s debut novel, a young man puts his ordinary life on hold and goes to post-revolution Prague in search of all the usual things young people go searching for in Prague. But, as reviewer Yulia Greyman observes, “false selves are a part of love.”

Sparta, Iraq

August 1, 2013
Sparta, Iraq

“We must compensate the man for the loss of his gun,” wrote Virginia Woolf. Roxana Robinson’s riveting new novel challenges us to imagine how we can do that as we work for peace.

My Life as a Mannequin

August 1, 2013
My Life as a Mannequin

A young man on a tentative law school track encounters the fiction of Philip Roth, and suddenly, his lostness acquires a commanding sense of purpose. An essay by Barrett Hathcock.

Lord of the Round Table

August 1, 2013
Lord of the Round Table

The Lord of the Rings draws on many medieval stories and myths. Oddly absent, however, are overt references to the one myth that ruled them all. A newly published poem fills that gap – but it may bemuseTolkein’s usual readers.

The Heartless World

August 1, 2013
The Heartless World

‘Everyone knows who won the war,’ runs the refrain of Muriel Rukeyser’s Savage Coast; her newly published 1930 novel about the Spanish Civil War shows what it meant to be a witness to it.

When One Lives Among Greyhounds

August 1, 2013
When One Lives Among Greyhounds

The stories of British writer H.H. Munro, known by his pen-name Saki, are devastating studies in torment and cruelty; they’re also exceptionally funny. A new collection offers a bracing reminder of that duality.

It’s a Mystery: “The Devil’s lair never looks like you expect”

August 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “The Devil’s lair never looks like you expect”

From the surfeit of Scandinavian thrillers comes one that stands out with the best: Bad Blood by Arne Dahl.

Nothing Like Being Scared

July 1, 2013
Nothing Like Being Scared

Shirley Jackson is best known – infamous, even – for her chilling story “The Lottery.” But it’s her novel We Have Always Lived in the Castle, where battle rages between evil within and without, that’s her masterpiece.

Arendt in New York City

July 1, 2013
Arendt in New York City

When Hannah Arendt published Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1964, her moral authority was called into question. Now Margarethe von Trotta’s new film Hannah Arendt explores both who has the right and who has the responsibility to speak about the Holocaust.

Keeping Up with the Tudors: Him Again

July 1, 2013
Keeping Up with the Tudors: Him Again

In the famous jingle ‘divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived,’ Katherine Parr comes last – the sixth wife of King Henry VIII. But she was far more than that – scholar, regent, and passionate young woman – as a new Tudor historical novel attempts to portray

It’s a Mystery: “There is within every man and woman a core of evil only lightly held in check”

July 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “There is within every man and woman a core of evil only lightly held in check”

An auspicious debut, The Abomination is a riveting conspiracy thriller by Jonathan
Holt. Plus, Philip Kerr’s cheeky, charismatic Berlin cop Bernie Gunther is back in A Man Without Breath.

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

July 1, 2013
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

As the haze and heat of summer kick into full swing, the folk of Open Letters break out their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

July 1, 2013
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

Our feature continues, as more Open Letters folk share their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

Ink a Dinka Don’t

June 1, 2013
Ink a Dinka Don’t

Is close reading disappearing? And is that the most pressing problem facing universities? Terry Eagleton’s latest, How to Read Literature is a plea for a return to what made the humanities worth knowing.

Full of High Sentence

June 1, 2013
Full of High Sentence

Richard Ford likes complexity, and he filled his novel, The Sportswriter, with sonnet-like weights and counterweights of tangled and gorgeous intricacy. As Spencer Lenfield’s reading demonstrates, single sentences can contain worlds.

June 2013 Issue

June 1, 2013
June 2013 Issue

Olivia Manning: A Woman at War
By Deirdre David
Oxford University Press, 2013
When is a woman writer not a “woman writer”? What does it mean to claim or resist that identity — for a woman who writes, …

Mé Féin

June 1, 2013
Mé Féin

Fintan O’Toole is an idealist about Irish republicanism and his books begin a desperately necessary conversation. It’s a bad sign, though, that he can’t quite get past the preliminaries.

All the Absolutely Fabulous Gatsbys

June 1, 2013
All the Absolutely Fabulous Gatsbys

Baz Luhrmann’s blockbuster is merely the newest Great Gatsby for film or television–four adaptations before it attempted to capture the dazzle and pathos of the classic. Matt Sadler us on a tour of West Egg across the decades.

Home from the Raj

June 1, 2013
Home from the Raj

Nice as it is to revisit old friends, readers of Jane Gardam’s latest may end up wondering if all the most interesting things happened somewhere else, at some other time.

It’s a Mystery: “If you chase two rabbits, you will not catch either one”

June 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery:  “If you chase two rabbits, you will not catch either one”

John le Carré, the pre-eminent spy writer of the 20th century and beyond, dazzles us again with A Delicate Truth. Plus a debut addition to the ranks of the genre, Red Sparrow, might just earn the author Jason Matthews a pat on the back from the master.

It Might Have Been

May 1, 2013
It Might Have Been

In life there are no second chances, no do-overs. But what if we could keep trying until we got it right? Kate Atkinson explores the possibilities in a novel that just might win her a coveted literary prize or two.

Snobs of Extraordinary Ability

May 1, 2013
Snobs of Extraordinary Ability

In Andre Aciman’s latest novel, a man recalls his time as a graduate student at Harvard, revisiting the early days of a long-estranged friendship.

The Madwoman and the Critic

May 1, 2013
The Madwoman and the Critic

On Kate Zambreno’s Heroines and the crime of dismissive criticism in both Bookforum and The LA Review of Books

Balkan Zoology

May 1, 2013
Balkan Zoology

Tea Obreht’s The Tiger’s Wife was universally acclaimed by critics, but behind its beautiful writing lie some dangerously unexamined stereotypes about the Balkans. Pedja Jurisic digs beneath the mythology.

Second Glance: Another City

May 1, 2013
Second Glance: Another City

Mark Wallace’s novels won’t be found at a Barnes & Noble, and that may be a shame beyond words: both Dead Carnival and The Quarry and the Lot reveal haunting truths and wrestle language into terrifying attitudes.

Razing Hell

May 1, 2013
Razing Hell

In a new memoir packed with garbled madness, we get a funhouse-mirror autobiography of the legendary Richard Hell, who did more than anybody to invent punk rock and only haphazardly survived to tell the tale

No Kaddish For Old Men

May 1, 2013
No Kaddish For Old Men

Does love create an unbridgeable distance between two souls? Marco Roth’s searching memoir of his microbiologist father alternates between longing and numbness in its search for what, if anything, binds fathers and sons

Infinite Reflection

May 1, 2013
Infinite Reflection

Born of ancient Buddhist philosophy into the fragments of the modern world, Yoko Ogawa’s Revenge asks essential questions about what it means to be human.

It’s a Mystery: “Half of the future is buried in the past”

May 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “Half of the future is buried in the past”

Two seductive thrillers: one starring a fearless female cop, the other a boatload of washed-up MI5 spies.

In the Shadow of a Hero: Anne Morrow Lindbergh

April 1, 2013
In the Shadow of a Hero: Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Traumatized by her baby’s kidnapping and murder, disappointed in her marriage to a fallen hero, Anne Morrow Lindbergh found hope in the beautiful, fragile shells she found on the beach. The result was her gentle masterpiece Gifts from the Sea.

Master of the Morbid

April 1, 2013
Master of the Morbid

The lurid pathology of Patrick McGrath’s fiction – its endless procession of madmen, derelicts, and misguided psychiatrists – can often blind us to the fact that he is first of all a historical novelist – and a great one.

Of Mice and Men

April 1, 2013
Of Mice and Men

Why, asks James Meek’s latest novel, should the rich get smoother, easier lives than their less well-paid fellow men? And what can an innovative novelist do with the oft-visited ‘immoral rich versus honorable poor’ premise?

The Night Train for Naples: Gorky in Italy

April 1, 2013
The Night Train for Naples: Gorky in Italy

The great Russian writer Maxim Gorky’s heart may always have been in Russia, but for years his intermittent stays in Italy stirred his creativity and fired his passion. “In love you discover everything right away,” he wrote – and he loved Italy.

I Groan In Silence

April 1, 2013
I Groan In Silence

The media just won’t leave old man Voltaire alone! We run a transcript of the latest interview.

From the Archives: Embossed Coins

April 1, 2013
From the Archives: Embossed Coins

Elie Wiesel once claimed “a novel about Treblinka is either not a novel or not about Treblinka.” How does Steve Sem-Sandberg grapple with representing the unrepresentable in his sweeping chronicle of the Łódź ghetto, The Emperor of Lies? A review from our archives.

Troppo Sottile

March 1, 2013
Loving Venice

Venice has traded flinty commercial acumen and world-weary merchant princes for an ennui worthy of M. John Harrison’s science fiction; her profession has now become the art of insubstantiality. For centuries authors have tried and failed to capture her. Steve Donoghue surveys the glorious wreckage.

Her Hands Full of Sugar-Plums

March 1, 2013
Her Hands Full of Sugar-Plums

George Eliot’s Middlemarch is beloved for its wit and wisdom. But behind its many beauties lurks a disquieting possibility: that misery is the price we must pay for morality.

The Flimsiness of Difference

March 1, 2013
The Flimsiness of Difference

After fictionalizing his experiences in his previous four books, Aleksandar Hemon revisits his memories in a new collection of essays.

Exit the Dragons

March 1, 2013
Exit the Dragons

Yes, we know Sam Lipsyte’s stories are laugh-out-loud funny. But all that low comedy–the pratfalls, the dirty jokes–serves as the ballast for some of the darkest stories in contemporary fiction. Steve Danziger elaborates.

Trauma Room

March 1, 2013
Trauma Room

To make something we must first unmake or take apart something else. Why, then, in a novel preoccupied with acts of destruction and reconstruction, does Pat Barker not offer a corresponding deformation of form? Has her critique of Modernism led her to disavow art altogether?

Unhappy In Its Own Way

March 1, 2013
Unhappy In Its Own Way

Car crashes, suburban swingers’ societies, accidental prostitution, Nixon enthusiasts, and a cameo performance by Don DeLillo – in her latest novel, A.M. Homes maintains her equilibrium

It’s a Mystery: “The most successful criminals don’t look the part”

March 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery:  “The most successful criminals don’t look the part”

Ghostman, by Roger Hobbs, is a dazzling debut that deserves a place as a benchmark of the crime-thriller genre

Queen of the Gypsies

February 1, 2013
10

Spoiler alert! It’s a familiar warning — but isn’t it also a silly one? There’s so much more to novels than their plots. And yet what if we’re better readers for not knowing? Consider The Mill on the Floss, for example.

Puce Needle Diggings

February 1, 2013
Puce Needle Diggings

When the Paris Review, long regarded as a literary standard-bearer, publishes a volume on the art of the short story, it flushes a flurry of conversations into the open: what is a short story? What constitutes an anthology-worthy example? What’s the audience for this kind of thing? And: can these stories answer such questions?

Flowers in the Pit

February 1, 2013
7

“The eye says ‘Here is Anna Karenina,’” wrote Virginia Woolf; “A voluptuous lady in black velvet wearing pearls comes before us. But the brain says ‘that is no more Anna Karenina than it is Queen Victoria.’” Joe Wright’s cinematic adaptation of Tolstoy’s classic avoids the pitfalls of such literalism.

A Little Cryptic, A Little Proud, A Little Mad

February 1, 2013
storm of wings

In M. John Harrison’s lyrical Viriconium trilogy, the high science of quantum physics meets the low art of fighting giant locusts. Justin Hickey finds a quiet spot to watch the chitin fly.

Epstein’s Kaleidoscope

February 1, 2013
Epstein’s Kaleidoscope

Joseph Epstein has a cult following as a sharp-tongued critic and essayist. His latest collection showcases his love of words and ideas as well as his caustic wit.

Absent Friends: “Warm, funny, sad, true … It is Perfect”

February 1, 2013
conflict of interest – brattle – oct 2012

“The proper function of a critic is to save a tale from the artist who created it” wrote D. H. Lawrence, but sometimes – most of the time – despite the best efforts of the best critics, both tale and artist disappear. What do we do with the criti-cal darlings of yesteryear, now filling the library bargain sale? And what of the critics, who called them imperishable?

Humor: Wayward Authors Nabbed!

February 1, 2013
7

The startling revelations in Anonymous turn out to be only the beginning: literary sleuths have uncovered a slew of other authorial misdemeanors.

Back, Back, Down the Old Ways of Time: D. H. Lawrence in Italy

February 1, 2013
Back, Back, Down the Old Ways of Time: D. H. Lawrence in Italy

Year after year, D. H.Lawrence found love, lust, and gainful employment in Italy – and through the strange alchemy of the place, he also found the inspirations for some of his most enduring works of art.

Fiona’s Gambit

February 1, 2013
Fiona’s Gambit

John le Carré is still as popular as he’s ever been, but what about Len Deighton? Our correspondent has gone back to Deighton’s novels and found their Cold War intrigue and human dramas as rewarding as ever.

It’s a Mystery: “To the dead we owe only truth”

February 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery:  “To the dead we owe only truth”

Watching the Dark, the latest in Peter Robinson’s Inspector Banks series, shows the master crime writer at the top of his form.

We’ve Been with Lizzie All Along

February 1, 2013
pride

A conversation about the enduring appeal of Pride & Prejudice.

From the Archives: A Map of Faces

February 1, 2013
From the Archives: A Map of Faces

In 2011, Aleksandar Hemon chooses his favorite short fiction from all across Europe. From our archives, Kevin Frazier celebrated these bracing imports.

Tom and Em

January 1, 2013
Tom and Em

It is said that Thomas Hardy fell deeply in love with his wife, Emma, only after she died. Stephen Akey revisits the stunning, elegiac poetry he wrote in her memory.

Tea with the Pushkins in Brussels

January 1, 2013
Tea with the Pushkins in Brussels

Say “Evgeny Onegin” to any educated Russian and you will trigger the first stanza or two of Pushkin’s great novel in verse. Now Russia’s national poet is finally coming into his own in the West as well.

Thinking God Knows What: James Joyce and Trieste

January 1, 2013
Thinking God Knows What: James Joyce and Trieste

Unsettled and penniless, James Joyce’s exile was initially more imrpovised than cunning. Luciano Mangiafico tells the story of his early years on the continent.

Being Jonathan Harker: recollections of The Dead English

January 1, 2013
Being Jonathan Harker: recollections of <em>The Dead English</em>

Not every actor gets the plum role of vampire hunter and romantic lead Jonathan Harker. Steve Brachmann reflects on his part in the Dracula-inspired rock musical The Dead English

It’s a Mystery: “Life is what happens to ‘trust no one’”

January 1, 2013
It’s a Mystery: “Life is what happens to ‘trust no one’”

Dan Fesperman’s The Double Game is a complex literary novel of intrigue that makes spy fiction a central character, “doubling” the reading pleasure.

Moving-Away

January 1, 2013
Moving-Away

The Hemingway Library has given us a variorum edition of A Farewell to Arms with 39 alternate endings. But how might Hemingway himself have felt about the resulting collage?

American Aristocracy: Gods of Copley Square – Centerpiece 5

January 1, 2013
American Aristocracy: Gods of Copley Square – Centerpiece 5

A rumor of Narnia at Trinity Church prompts two questions. Can a building have a spiritual life? Can a work of art not? Phillips Brooks and the idea of ecstasy

The Prince of the Powers of the Air

December 1, 2012
The Prince of the Powers of the Air

Anthony Burgess is famous, but not for his best book. John Cotter sees your A Clockwork Orange and raises you the new Europa edition of Earthly Powers.

A Great and Sustaining Mystery

December 1, 2012
A Great and Sustaining Mystery

Anthony Burgess the novelist had dreams of being a composer. He had little success, but along the way he delved deep into the nature and meaning of music.

Closest to Perfection

December 1, 2012
Closest to Perfection

Europa Editions has reprinted Anthony Burgess’ masterpiece Earthly Powers. Our editors talk about that seminal volume which has inspired an issue wide celebration of Burgess and his work.

Real Full Rich Rank

December 1, 2012
Real Full Rich Rank

Respectable novelists are solemn, meditative, and deliberate–they certainly don’t churn out book reviews every week. Anthony Burgess smashed that fussy mold and left us a lifetime’s work of brilliant, omnivorous literary journalism.

Rarest Spun Heavenmetal

December 1, 2012
Rarest Spun Heavenmetal

A Clockwork Orange turned 50 this year and received the gift of an anniversary edition. Justin Hickey looks anew at the novel Anthony Burgess claimed to have knocked off in three weeks, and which made him famous.

Unorientalized

December 1, 2012
Unorientalized

Anthony Burgess’ first novels were a series of dark comedies set in colonial Malaya. Did he fall prey to Edward Said’s Orientalist crtitique, or did he anticipate it?

Entitled to Extravagance: Some Historical Fictions of Anthony Burgess

December 1, 2012
Entitled to Extravagance: Some Historical Fictions of Anthony Burgess

Some of Anthony Burgess’ most accomplished inventions roam into the past, to Shakespeare and Marlowe’s England and Jesus’ Judea. How well has his historical fiction stood up across the years?

Ou-Boum

December 1, 2012
Ou-Boum

“I knew my trip would mean an encounter with Adela Quested”: Victoria Olsen reflects on what she found, and what was lost in translation, when she travelled to India with E. M. Forster on her mind.

It’s A Mystery: “Three things that come without asking: fear, love and jealousy.”

December 1, 2012
Blackhouse

A city in northern England and a remote Scottish island are appropriately bleak settings to launch two impressive new series.

A Year in Reviews at OL Weekly

December 1, 2012
A Year in Reviews at OL Weekly

Open Letters Weekly has been the venue for hundreds of book reviews in 2012. For your reading pleasure and holiday book-buying convenience, we gather them here in chronological order.

The Ghosts of Monmouth County

November 1, 2012
The Ghosts of Monmouth County

Bossophilia: The idolization of Bruce Springsteen that comes from midlife nostalgia and a fear of dying. Steve Danziger confronts the phenomenon, and a new biography.

Never-Neverland

November 1, 2012
Never-Neverland

The fairy tale has been through several metamorphoses; the next might result in its extinction. Max Ross reviews Jack Zipes’s cultural history of the genre.

Borges and You

November 1, 2012
Borges and You

Although I would rather do almost anything than attend a literary reading (like, for instance, stay home and read), I made an exception for Jorge Luis Borges when he lectured to a packed house at …

Performance Anxiety

November 1, 2012
Performance Anxiety

What does it mean to say “only the music matters?” In her bleakly intelligent new novel, Lynne Sharon Schwartz challenges us to consider what we really value in music and how our own demand for superhuman perfection strips it of its soul.

It’s a Mystery: “The only way a man learns the true spirit of a rock is to stub his toe on it”

November 1, 2012
It’s a Mystery: “The only way a man learns the true spirit of a rock is to stub his toe on it”

William Kent Krueger and Steve Hamilton, authors of two critically acclaimed series, have winning new detective novels. Irma Heldman reviews.

This Light is Enough

November 1, 2012
This Light is Enough

Renowned reviewer and cultural critic Daniel Mendelsohn has a scintillating new collection of his recent work; John Cotter and Steve Donoghue compare notes on “Waiting for the Barbarians”

The Least Inauthentic Self

November 1, 2012
The Least Inauthentic Self

How can writers depict the fragmented modern soul? For Zadie Smith, the solution is an untidy, fragmented novel. M.K. Hall reviews NW

Book Review: London Eye

October 27, 2012
london eye

In the opening volume of the “Toxic City” series, London is cut off from the rest of the world and filling up with super-powered mutants – two things which have been true on YouTube for some time now.

First Person Singular

October 1, 2012
First Person Singular

Can a famously cold and impersonal writer like Paul Auster make a memoir of aging that works against his strengths? And are they strengths after all?

Nine Ways of Looking at D’Annunzio

October 1, 2012
Nine Ways of Looking at D’Annunzio

Madman, lothario, despot, drug fiend, friend and enemy of Mussolini – and immortal poet. Gabriele D’Annunzio was all of these things and many more in his whirlwind of a life.

Claiming the Future

October 1, 2012
Claiming the Future

Julio Cortázar and Gabriel Garcia Marquez brought Latin American fiction to the attention of the world. Now a young crop of writers are trying to move beyond magical realism–a new anthology charts the diverse approaches.

It’s a Mystery: “Nobody escaped the desire for vengeance. Nobody.”

October 1, 2012
It’s a Mystery: “Nobody escaped the desire for vengeance. Nobody.”

The seventeenth Lee Child is vintage Jack Reacher and the eighth Louise Penny is, as always, compelling and charismatic

Book Review: The Exceptions

September 29, 2012
the exceptions

The son of a powerful crime family falls in love with a young woman in the Witness Protection Program – a young woman his family wants dead! Don’t you hate it when that happens?

Other Than Faith

September 1, 2012
9780805094725

What does the soul-searching writer do when the concept of the soul–to say nothing of God–has lost its currency? Two new confessional novels try to navigate that uncharted territory.

Books Before and After

September 1, 2012
6

It’s a bridge, a barrier, and a burden; it’s used in the bedroom, the kitchen, and the outhouse. Leah Price helps us think again about what we can, should, or want to do with that most fetishized of objects: the book.

Wagner’s Inferno

September 1, 2012
0406minos (2)

The worlds of fine art, porno, hollywood, meth addiction, and quality lit cross and recombine in Bruce Wagner’s latest Dead Stars. We made this culture, now what do we make of it?

Attainted: The Life and Afterlife of Ezra Pound in Italy

September 1, 2012
ep

Pound wrote The Pisan Cantos on toilet paper while prisoner in an open-air metal cage during WWII, and he spent many of the following years in mental hospitals. “I can get along with crazy people,” he quipped. “It’s only the fools I can’t stand.”

Trouble in Mind

September 1, 2012
10

What would it mean if history were a joke, a shaggy dog story? J. G. Farrell’s bleakly funny Troubles reflects the struggle of post-war British literature to come to terms with the inheritance of modernism.

Therapeutic Wordsworth

September 1, 2012
Prelude

There are warring schools of fad and interpretation, there are critical readings of an hour or a season – and then there’s Wordsworth’s verse itself, annotating and amplifying the personal reading experience.

It’s a Mystery: “No one is infallible or invisible”

September 1, 2012
FranckThilliez

A rare film is the centerpiece of Syndrome E, a cutting-edge, mesmerizing thriller.

From the Archives: A Voyeur in the Archives

September 1, 2012
wallacedelillo

“Ellis, Leyner, Leavitt, Franzen, Powers…their fictions reduce to complaints and self-pity. Dostoevski has balls.” This and other gleanings from a trip to the David Foster Wallace archives.

Good in the Good Sense: Antonio Machado

August 1, 2012
camposdecastilla

The great Antonio Machado loved his native Spain and was disgusted by its descent into fascism; that fusion of enchantment and grief vivifies his unforgettable poetry.

It’s a Mystery: “Every man has his price”

August 1, 2012
HouseBlood

Two scalpel-sharp political thrillers that mark the welcome return of the thoroughly winning, charismatic protagonists: Charlie Muffin and Joe DeMarco.

‘Glory, Maiden, Glory!’: The Uncomfortable Chivalry of Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe

August 1, 2012
8

You think you know Ivanhoe: it’s the original swash-buckling adventure story, full of fights, escapes, ambushes, and then, of course, a happy ending. But what you see if you look more closely may make you think twice about its chivalric ideals.

Humane to Hornets: The Poetry of James Schuyler

July 1, 2012
afewdays

The verses of the neglected poet James Schuyler seem to ramble, but they don’t really ramble; they seem dishevelled, but they aren’t; they seem miniaturist, but they contain whole worlds. Stephen Akey makes the case for your renewed attention.

Much God damned Entropy

July 1, 2012
WGaddis

2012, a William Gaddis renaissance year, sees the reissue of the author’s awesome, strangely prescient 1975 novel J R. Greg Gerke and Gabriel Blackwell discuss their experiences tackling the tome.

The Twilight(ing) of the Superhero

July 1, 2012
spiderman 2 poster

Nerdy teenager Peter Parker was bitten by a radioactive spider – and a super-franchise was born! As a new blockbuster Spider-Man movie hits the summer theaters, Justin Hickey takes us on a tour of the character’s colorful – and often tortured – past!

A Measure of the Master: Georges Simenon’s romans durs

July 1, 2012
GSimenon

The inventor of the beloved Inspector Maigret was gigantically prolific – hundreds of novels, churned out at lightning speed (80 pages a day, according to the author himself) – and in this as in many other things, Georges Simenon was a world unto himself.

It’s a Mystery: “A good detective assumes nothing”

July 1, 2012
PLovesey

Cop to Corpse, the 12th in Peter Lovesey’s Detective Supt. Peter
Diamond series, finds the master at the top of his form.

Peer Review: Home

June 1, 2012
USA – Television – Oprah

Book reviewers are split on whether Toni Morrison’s new novel is a further triumph or a falling off. Or have these critics only found what they anticipated? We review the reviews, then we review the book.

Endless Forms Most Brutal

June 1, 2012
Prometheus

As Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus” takes movie-goers back to the world of his “Alien” classics, we take a look at the long and lively history of modern cinema’s most famous monsters.

The Dangers of Failing to Lesnerize

June 1, 2012
galaxy

Dubbed the Voltaire of science fiction, Robert Sheckley often denied that there was anything serious in his fabulations. But a new collection belies the claim, displaying inventive satire mixed with wisdom

Macaroni and Cheese

June 1, 2012
16

“You come as opportunely as cheese on macaroni” is a terrible line, a symptom of all the reasons George Eliot’s Romola is a failure. But is failure really such a bad thing? Maybe a novelist’s reach should exceed her grasp.

Second Glance: The Conrad Connection

June 1, 2012
heartofdarkness

This picaresque classic by Colombian novelist Álvaro Mutis doubles as an extended valentine to the author of Heart of Darkness. Robert Latona revisits it.

It’s a Mystery: “Life is an ever-unfolding panoply of marvels”

June 1, 2012
nicevillecarstenstroud

Carsten Stroud’s Niceville is a wildly edgy thriller with the heart of a dark comedy–our resident mystery maven reviews

From the Archives: Supping with Glaucus: A Tour of Roman Historical Fiction

June 1, 2012
barba_the_slaver

Steve Donoghue takes the emperor’s box to thumbs-up or thumbs-down an array of Roman historical novels, as “A Year with the Romans” continues.

From the Archives: Second Glance: The Radicalism of Felix Holt

June 1, 2012
Eliot

Felix Holt, the Radical may be one of George Eliot’s least-read novels, but its questions about a democracy that puts power in the hands of “ignorant numbers” still have both moral and political resonance.

Affliction Fiction

May 1, 2012
immobility

Brian Evenson’s work is a violent exploration of a violent medium: language. His new novel Immobility and the stories collected in Windeye continue that journey into dark territory.

All the World to Nothing

May 1, 2012
9

The real mystery of Richard III is not the fate of his nephews, the Princes in the Tower, but why we never tire of telling and re-telling his story. What do we really see when we stare at his enigmatic portrait?

Facts, And The Lying Liars Who Tell Them

May 1, 2012
JD’AgataJFingal

Art, Truth, Data, Sex, and Facebook–rabble-roused by John D’Agata and Jim Fingal’s The Lifespan of a Fact, Max Ross connects them in a key to all nonfiction aesthetics

Monumental and Fragile

May 1, 2012
sikuquanshu

No form of literature seems as thoroughly doomed in the 21st century as the printed encyclopedia, but even dinosaurs can have rich and rewarding life-stories. Where did we go, before we all went to the Internet?

Ghost Town Apostle

May 1, 2012
abandoned-house

Ken Layne’s political writing is sharp and raucus, and a novel about a financially devastated near-future United States would seem like a perfect vehicle for more anger. But though that fire is still there, a gentle-but-compelling spiritualist tone has risen to to the fore.

Bad for You

May 1, 2012
collossus

Known as much for how she exited her life as for the poetry she wrote during it, Sylvia Plath remains a polarizing figure in the world of verse. What are we reading, when we subject ourselves to her poems?

Aid in the Labyrinth

May 1, 2012
RJ1914-1965

Randall Jarrell was suspicious of attempts to turn criticism into a science: he wrote as a reader, for other readers, with the work itself foremost in his mind.

A Rasp in the Air

May 1, 2012
KBTALK

A thumping mix-tape of dystopian fantasy and gangster noir, Kevin Barry’s City of Bohane defies easy categorization–but does it offer a story to match its stylistic bravura?

Into the Breach: Battle Royale and Hunger Games

April 1, 2012
HungerGames

The box office record-setting movie adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games is the latest incarnation of an unsettling children-as-prey plot that’s been with us in one form or another for a long time – and never more vividly than in Koushun Takami’s Battle Royale

Downright Rude: Reading Catullus

April 1, 2012
poemsofcatullus-green

The raw sexuality of the Catullus’ love poems keeps them alive even today, and the things he implied about Julius Caesar STILL can’t be repeated in polite conversation – how do we deal with this young man who’s always making us feel just a bit uncomfortable?

The People’s Prisoner

April 1, 2012
TiananmenSquareJune289

When the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in 2010, it was given to an empty chair. Its recipient, Liu Xiaobo, was in prison for advocating human rights in China. Though he is still incarcerated, a collection of essays sheds light on his thought and struggle.

Second Glance: Seth Morgan and the Kamikaze Novel

April 1, 2012
jhouse

With its headspinning wordplay and lunatic cast of characters, Seth Morgan’s 1990 novel Homeboy blazed like a comet into the literary pantheon. Steve Danziger revisits this grime crime classic.

American Aristocracy – Harvard Pulpit: Boston Brahmin Liberalism

April 1, 2012
MIT postcard

To the quintessential virtues the Puritans lent to a fledgling republic – globality, philantropy, and autonomy – the ‘speaking aristocracy’ of the Boston Brahmins added one more: the love of learning

Making the List

April 1, 2012
sutherland

Long-time critic John Sutherland’s latest book The Lives of the Novelists takes readers on a biographical tour of 294 creators’ lives. But does it work? Long-time critic Steve Donoghue and novelist John Cotter try to figure that out.

It’s a Mystery: “The world is a great honeycombed thing”

April 1, 2012
NHarkaway

In Nick Harkaway’s altogether remarkable novel Angelmaker, blistering gangster noir meets Rabelaisian comedy

Humanitarian Disaster Romance

April 1, 2012
kimproces

In The Orphan Master’s Son, Adam Johnson evokes the brutality of North Korea’s authoritarian regime by way of an over-the-top love story. Joyce W. Lee investigates whether torture and romance can coexist in one novel.

Cato of the Antipodes

March 1, 2012
1321632

Of his 60+ books, one in particular, The United States, is best representative of his work as a whole and, by readers, best loved. On the Collected Essays of Gore Vidal.

Seer Blest

March 1, 2012
FormsofAttentionKermode

Frank Kermode consumed all of the tumultuous 20th century’s literary theories without being consumed by them. A look at the work of this wisest of secular clerics.

Shore to Shore

March 1, 2012
ewilson

For two generations, the great American critic and man of letters Edmund Wilson has been instructing and delighting his readers – and inspiring some of them to become critics themselves.

Queen Elizabeth the First

March 1, 2012
HardwickAmericanFictions

Elizabeth Hardwick joined the literary world of mid-20th century Manhattan with every intention of making her mark upon it – which she did, in review after inimitable review, taking American book-discourse to levels and places it had never reached before

The Tigers of Wrath

March 1, 2012
WhyTrillingMatters

Where would Lionel Trilling, godfather of the liberal imagination, fit into our contemporary culture of ideas? And how much of that culture is of his making?

The Knower and the Sayer

March 1, 2012
leaves_of_grass

Most criticism is reactive, but in his essay “The Poet,” Ralph Waldo Emerson proved prophetic. He set a challenge and Walt Whitman took him up on it.

Acts of Rendition

March 1, 2012
PoetryPragmatism

Richard Poirier was one of the great bridge-builders–his sorely neglected classic A World Elsewhere drew upon the writing of Emerson but presciently anticipated the postmodernist ideas that would soon enter the mainstream.

How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lane

March 1, 2012
LaneCurrentCinema

The best of Anthony Lane’s many New Yorker reviews and essays were collected in Nobody’s Perfect, a big volume that amply displays this writer’s wit and subtlety.

A Talent for Deception

March 1, 2012
Curtain

Agatha Christie has received praise from wide and varied corners, and mystery columnist Irma Heldman adds to the chorus with this retrospective on the life and work of the Queen of Crime.

A Fine Romance

February 1, 2012
everything-i-know-about-love-i-learned-from-romance-novels

Is there more to romance fiction than perfect people meeting cute and living happily ever after? Sarah Wendell thinks so, but her arguments in defense of this most reviled of genres may themselves sell it short.

Wallace Stevens: A Spirit Storming

February 1, 2012
Harmonium

Wallace Stevens, so long considered the driest and most cerebral of poets, can in fact touch the soul. It all hangs on the nature of poetry itself, what it is.

Trompe L’oeil

February 1, 2012
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Eli Gottlieb’s novels are built on dissimulation: lies to be cruel, lies to be kind … how does this formula hold in The Face Thief, and what is Gottlieb getting at?

Falling for the Big Con

February 1, 2012
NightClass

This new novel has all the grit, violence, and hopelessness we expect of the noir sub-genre, but here it’s infused with an almost philosophical edge.

Crowd Control to Major Tom

February 1, 2012
Remainder

Tom McCarthy’s Derrida-inspired linguistic and narrative fixations are once again on full display in Men in Space, his first novel now reissued after the popularity of Remainder and C

Recognizably Human: Larkin and the Sentimental

February 1, 2012
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Nobody would accuse the mature Larkin of being a greeting card poet, and yet a warm and even vulnerable sentimentality bubbles up in his verse, often when it’s least expected.

It’s a Mystery: “He’s the gray cardinal of the Kremlin”

February 1, 2012
ChrisMorganJones

The Silent Oligarch is a smashing debut thriller that has Chris Morgan Jones assuming the le Carré mantle in his own very original way

Looking for Laura

February 1, 2012
LauraStephenEarlswoodAsylum

She’s a shadow, an absence, that haunts the letters, diaries, and novels of her famous half-sister Virginia Woolf. What can we really know about Laura Stephen?

Radical Acceptance

February 1, 2012
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Ayad Akhtar’s debut novel American Dervish describes joins a Pakistani-American boy’s coming-of-age story with the exploration of a Muslim family’s assimilation into picket-fenced suburbs. What traditions will be kept or compromised? And more importantly, how well does the author present his vision?

Coterminous

January 1, 2012
Whitman of Tikrit

If anything’s taboo in our society it’s a thoughtful, humanistic portrait of a terrorist, which is why more established writers failed where Jarett Kobek delivers something new.

The Quiet One

January 1, 2012
branwellbronteportrait

Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is usually overshadowed by her sisters’ masterpieces, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, but this gripping novel, a startling exposé of Victorian patriarchy, deserves a turn in the spotlight.

Devil Twins

January 1, 2012
cosmopolis

Is Don DeLillo’s short game as good as his long? Is it better? His first collection of short fiction — or is it his first? — offers occasion to take the much-lauded writer’s measure.

It’s a Mystery: “Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery”

January 1, 2012
prideandprejudice

P.D. James takes on Jane Austen: a match made in elite whodunit heaven.

“The Desire for Motion”: Tagore’s Three Voices

January 1, 2012
tagoreb

Prince of the Bengali renaissance, internationally feted poet, composer, painter, educator — why don’t we know Rabindranath Tagore today? And will a new book open our eyes?

Between the Devil and Aunt Edna

December 1, 2011
Rattigan

His own life was the great tragedy he was never quite able to write. Michael Adams assesses the career of playwright Terence Rattigan.

Over Grinton Bridge: Riding into the Heart of Reformation

December 1, 2011
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A rich, beautiful, but sadly neglected historical masterpiece: Hilda Prescott’s The Man on a Donkey is the War and Peace of the English Reformation

It’s a Mystery: “Small clues save you. Small errors kill.”

December 1, 2011
casinoroyale

Carte Blanche is bestselling author Jeffrey Deaver’s new take on James Bond—bringing Agent 007 into the post-9/11 age.

“Writing Against Time”: An Interview With Benjamin Markovits

December 1, 2011
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“I made no particular effort to keep the portrait of Byron consistent from one novel to another. I wanted to show him in different lights, from different angles.” Joshua Lustig interviews the author of the esteemed Byron Trilogy.

Desultory Vivacity

November 1, 2011
middlemarch

Does marriage mean much anymore? Does the novel? Jeffrey Eugenides sets out to reinvent the classic literary story—but can he combine the style and the substance of the greats he hopes to update to our times?

An American in China

November 1, 2011
wartrashhajin

A meticulously-researched rendition of the horrifying massacres that comprised the “Rape of Nanjing” is the backdrop for Ha Jin’s latest telegraphic and affecting novel.

There Will Be No More Great Ideas

November 1, 2011
themanwithoutqualities

Robert Musil’s magnum opus The Man Without Qualities was groundbreaking not because it’s unfinished but because it’s unfinishable. A new study attempts to take scope of its deep and mesmerizing pointlessness.

It’s a Mystery: “A Father’s No Shield for His Child”

November 1, 2011
authors

A gripping thriller, the debut collaborative work from a duo of Danish writers, is the first in a trilogy you won’t soon forget.

Skulking in the Sewers

November 1, 2011
foucaultpendulumeci

Umberto Eco’s potboiling new novel The Prague Cemetery was denounced in Europe for anti-Semitism, and then went on to become a best-seller. Is the controversy valid? What strange creation has Eco brought forth?

In Lieu of a Drink

November 1, 2011
hitchenshat

Provocative public intellectual/muckraker Christopher Hitchens offers an enormous volume of collected essays and articles, probably his last.

Time Wounds All Heels

October 1, 2011
TTLighthouse

In Alan Hollinghurst’s new novel The Stranger’s Child the renown of a minor English poet balloons and distorts in each succeeding decade after his death

Down and Out in Luanda and Lisbon

October 1, 2011
antunes

Novelist António Lobo Antunes’ books are searing and wildly original indictments of Portugal’s needlessly protracted and bloody colonization of Angola.

A Crucible of the Human Spirit Guy

October 1, 2011
meanfreepath

Ben Lerner’s arresting first novel sets a funhouse mirror before the author’s own formative years as a poet, poseur, and pill-popper in Madrid.

The Birth of a Salesman

October 1, 2011
dewitt

Eleven years after her breakout novel The Last Samurai, Helen DeWitt returns to satirize the chattering nonsense of the corporate world.

It’s A Mystery: “He had never tried to hide from himself his taste for the hazard of sin.”

October 1, 2011
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A Death in Summer is the fourth and best addition to the literate, elegant mystery series by Benjamin Black, the pen name of an award-winning author.

Satanic Maggots

September 1, 2011
MrFortune’sMaggot

Colonialism, feminism, witchcraft, the Lord of Darkness — themes such as these once made Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novels bestsellers. Now her charmingly subversive fiction is back in print.

Love at First Glans

September 1, 2011
Vox

Nicholson Baker’s provocative new book is an attempt at mainstream literary pornography, but does it suffer from the same performance anxiety as other novelistic efforts to depict sex?

Oblivion

September 1, 2011
chinaberrytree

One of the most significant voices of the Harlem Renaissance was Jessie Redmon Fauset — novelist, essayist, translator, and editor. She’s become obscured behind many of the male writers she published, but Joanna Scutts returns her poignant work to the main stage

Three for the Boys

September 1, 2011
rot&ruin

Newly released in paperback are three Young Adult novels aimed at that sometimes-elusive reading demographic: teen boys.

Byronic Interludes

August 1, 2011
Lord Byron at 20

The larger-than-life exploits of Lord Byron drew an erratic and daunting trajectory through the lives of those nearest him. A trilogy of novels attempts to go where so many biographies have gone before.

‘What a Brain must Mine be!’: The Strange Historical Romances of William Harrison Ainsworth

August 1, 2011
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Once considered a credible rival to Dickens and Thackeray, W. H. Ainsworth is nearly forgotten today. It’s our loss: his historical novels – full of sensuous detail – run the gamut of romance and horror, tragedy and comedy.

A Jester During the Third Reich

August 1, 2011
IrmgardKeun

Irmgard Keun depicted exceptionally naive women and seemed even to play the the role herself, even suing The Gestapo for banning her books. But was there a strategy behind playing dumb?

The Bad Man Comes to Stay

August 1, 2011
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A witty young woman meets a devastating man — literally, he devastates her. From the wreck of her life she tells her tale, and it is a tale well told. Sex meets death in Deborah Kay Davies’ brilliant True Things About Me

Oh, the futility! Adapting Jane Eyre

July 1, 2011
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Its early readers found the novel shocking, unfeminine, un-Christian, revolutionary. So why are film adaptations of Jane Eyre so studiously inoffensive?

Sorokin’s Tyrannical Chosen

July 1, 2011
icetril

Vladimir Sorokin’s gruesome (and frequently censored) satires puncture Russia’s surprising nostalgia for the glory days of Stalin and Khrushchev; Amelia Glaser reviews two newly released works.

Not merely because of the fate of character

July 1, 2011
boully-spector

The self is strange and divided in Jenny Boully’s new book of poetry; Karen Hannah tries to piece it together.

On the Barricades with the Bourgeoisie

July 1, 2011
MillenniumPeople

Visionary novelist J.G. Ballard’s penultimate book “Millennium People,” about an outbreak of middle-class revolution and terrorism, has finally been published in the U.S.

Everything United In Her

July 1, 2011
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It’s a comfortable truism that the novels of Jane Austen are all things to all readers. But … a life-instruction manual? From the OLM Archives, a review of A Jane Austen Education

The Old Stories

June 1, 2011
rcoover

Good writers borrow, great writers steal. Sure, but should they steal whole characters? plots? authors? Robert Coover and the writers of Re: Telling steal it all and let their readers sort it out.

Michigan Falls

June 1, 2011
train ferry

Scott Sparling’s first novel Wire to Wire has rushed up at the reading world full of glue-sniffers, freight-hoppers, wedgeheads, and knives midair — so what’s it really about?

The Zither and the Worm

June 1, 2011
newimpressionsofafrica

French trailblazer Raymond Roussel created teeming and fertile worlds from a secret process of wordplay. Two of his most spectacular works are coming back into print after a long, undeserved absence.

Ah, the Merry Widows!

June 1, 2011
Michelle Latiolais

Widowhood is lonely, darkly comic, defiant, and emotionally vital in Michelle Latiolais’s new story collection. Jeff Bursey reviews.

The Obscure Object of Financial Fiction

May 1, 2011
jcartwright

How to write a great novel of the financial crisis? One contender has published his attempt, and it features an updated version of that bugbear figure from Shakespeare and Trollope: the Jewish banker.

Memo to a Colleague

May 1, 2011
marjoriegarber

Is Marjorie Garber’s defense of literary studies balm to the beleaguered English professor’s soul? Not yet, anyway.

Post-Communist Literature or How to Cure Baldness

May 1, 2011
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Walking talking cats? mysterious birthmarks? ancient secrets? Bogdan Suceava takes us to a strange place (Romania, present day) in his newly translated novel.

Invisible Man

May 1, 2011
bad nature

The omissions in Javier Marías’s beguiling, enigmatic novels are just as important as what appear on the page, and two newly translated books are marked by this juggling of the known and the unknown.

It’s a Mystery: “No person is without a shadow”

May 1, 2011
mankell

Kurt Wallander’s touching swan song shows why his creator Henning Mankell is an acknowledged master of the police procedural.

Bright Sparkling Speeches

May 1, 2011
FrancisSpufford

Francis Spufford’s new story collection blends fact and fiction to explore the truths and towering delusions of the Soviet economic system–and its production model, the American fast food chain.

The Tiger Whelp

May 1, 2011
Obrehttigerwife

Tea Obreht’s “The Tiger’s Wife” is one of the most heralded fiction debuts of the season. Kevin Frazier weighs the switch-ups of its tone against the beauties of its prose.

A Novelist in Tahrir Square

April 1, 2011
SiestaFrederickLewis

It’s fitting that Ahdaf Soueif is narrating this exciting new chapter in Egypt’s history: for decades she has offered her readers richer, more complicated stories of the Middle East than the commonplace ones of submission and extremism.

The Wanderer

April 1, 2011
centralskyline

The protagonist of Teju Cole’s “Open City” roams New York, gathering and subtly processing observations; Andrew Martin trails this enigmatic walker in the city.

I Is Someone Else

April 1, 2011
Night_1

Death-in-a-Box meditates on sameness, doubling, and identity’s dissolve. So who is this Alta Ifland? And what sets her apart?

Mad, Vlad, and Dangerous to Know

April 1, 2011
draculastoker

Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” is the epitome of lurking evil — but two recent novels do their best to unearth the smoldering bad-boy behind the murderous facade. So: Was Mina Harker smitten before she was bitten?

It’s a Mystery: “A spy causes far more trouble when he’s caught”

April 1, 2011
trinitysix

The premise of this elegantly wrought thriller puts a chilling new spin on the notorious British spy ring, “The Cambridge Five.”

Strange Silence

April 1, 2011
stanleyelkin

Stanley Elkin’s fiction is marked by verbal wizardry and a searing comic vision; does a new biography do justice to his underappreciated artistry?

Forever Nell

April 1, 2011
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She was an orange-seller, an actress, a whore, and the most popular of Charles II’s many mistresses: Nell Gwynn stars in two new novels.

Wife Number Five

April 1, 2011
CatherineHoward

Teenage Catherine Howard weds the older and ailing Henry VIII to serve her family’s ambition, and uses her status to take lovers of her own – risking everything. Novelist Suzannah Dunn spins a fine tale out of the girl’s brief rise and fall.

“He had become my Tarzan”

March 1, 2011
Tarzan Triumphs (movie poster)

Tarzan is one of the most popular fictional creations in modern times. Does the Ape Man define something essential in the human experience – or do we keep redefining Tarzan to suit our ever-changing needs?

The Muse of Trouville

February 1, 2011
durasseawall

‘She’s a drug; I’m her main focus, the focus of all her attention. No one has ever loved me like that.’ Victoria Best explores the fraught relationship between Marguerite Duras and the young man whose love inspired and tormented her.

Squid Pro Quo

February 1, 2011
Goldmansachsexecutivestestifysenate

Matt Taibbi is the foremost political-writing muckraker of his generation, matching an acerbic wit with a pressure-cooked prose style. But is there substance behind the bluster?

A Woman of High Courage

February 1, 2011
IndemnityOnly

For nearly three decades, Sara Paretsky has used the familiar form of the private eye novel to turn a critical eye on contemporary America. Rohan Maitzen reviews the latest in her V.I. Warshawski series.

A Visit from the Prince

February 1, 2011
A Visit from the Prince

You think you want to look beauty in the eye? Get ready to tremble… Alice Brittan reviews Michael Cunningham’s paradoxical novel “By Nightfall”.

Still Hoping for Her Close-Up

February 1, 2011
ghostlight

Molly Allgood was only a young, up-and-coming actress when her fiance J.M. Synge died of cancer. Joseph O’Connor’s novel “The Ghost Light” imagines how the rest of her life played out in the shadow of that loss.

One Common Reader

February 1, 2011
Fernalds1928

Virginia Woolf imagined the Almighty seeing us coming towards Paradise, books in hand: “We have nothing to give them, they have loved reading.” But does reading always bring salvation?

Fallout, Carry On

January 1, 2011
haring

Lance Olsen’s page-turning experimental novel-in-stories mugs, flirts, ends the world, and dares the reader to make a rondel of intuitive leaps.

Year with Short Novels: The Nihilism of Nathanael West

January 1, 2011
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His short novels are the ‘ugly stepchildren’ of 20th century fiction, and yet his admirers are legion; A Year with Short Novels takes a look at Nathanael West and his two best-known works.

Young Jew Telling Jokes

January 1, 2011
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Assimilation is the nightmare of Joshua Cohen’s daring novel “Witz,” and the book is therefore designed to be strange and prickly to the gentiles who try to read it.