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Articles in Fiction

Book Review: The Risen

May 26th, 2016
the risen

The familiar story of the Spartacus rebellion gets a lavish new telling

In Paperback: Manhattan Night

May 24th, 2016
manhattan nocturne

A terrific ten-year-old noir novel is given a new paperback edition on the occasion of its translation to the Hollywood screen.

Book Review: The Loney

May 22nd, 2016
loney

A violent, desolate stretch of the English coastline forms the setting for Andrew Michael Hurley’s much-heralded debut novel

Book Review: The Summer Guest

May 18th, 2016
the summer guest

A young woman’s diary of her friendship with Anton Chekhov raises the tantalizing possibility of a long-lost work by the master.

Book Review: Ice Station Nautilus

May 17th, 2016
ice station nautilus

Rick Campbell’s new novel features a fight to the death deep under the Arctic ice

Book Review: The Fireman

May 15th, 2016
the fireman

In Joe Hill’s new novel, a plague of spontaneous combustion is sweeping the world …

Discussion: Middlemarch for Book Clubs

May 2nd, 2016
lucyreadseliot

Open Letters Senior Editor Rohan Maitzen discusses her new ebook, Middlemarch for Book Clubs

Occasional Fiction

May 1st, 2016
Occasional Fiction

As a collection of stories about the complexities of marriage, Reader, I Married Him is good, sometimes even excellent. But how is it as a provocation to rethink Jane Eyre?

Atomic Turquoise Bat Mitzvah

May 1st, 2016
Atomic Turquoise Bat Mitzvah

A startling alien legacy is dug up out of the ground in Sylvain Neuvel’s stellar debut novel Sleeping Giants. Justin Hickey reviews.

Simulacrum

May 1st, 2016
Simulacrum

The intense problematics of Don DeLillo’s literary preoccupations are on full display in his latest, Zero K. Dan Green explores the legacy of an author’s postmodernism.

Second Glance: Njal’s Saga

May 1st, 2016
Second Glance: Njal’s Saga

Njal’s Saga is a myth based on history, a narrative about the effect of religion on a culture of revenge. Matt Ray takes us to medieval Iceland.

From Some Mountain Summit High in the Air: Lord Acton and History

May 1st, 2016
From Some Mountain Summit High in the Air: Lord Acton and History

History remembers him as the author of the famous dictum about power corrupting, but Lord Acton led an intense and fascinating life. Luciano Mangiafico tells his story.

It’s a Mystery: “Folly is like regret, it knows no limits”

May 1st, 2016
It’s a Mystery: “Folly is like regret, it knows no limits”

Old loyalties lead to explosive new dangers in two new mystery-thrillers set in North Carolina and Northern Ireland.

From the Archives: DeLillo and the Three Ps

May 1st, 2016
From the Archives: DeLillo and the Three Ps

The nation’s book critics naturally congregated when Don DeLillo’s Point Omega appeared. In an Open Letters Peer Review feature, John Rodwan supplies a scorecard for the players.

On Edwin O’Connor’s The Last Hurrah

April 1st, 2016
On Edwin O’Connor’s <em>The Last Hurrah</em>

In his essay on a new reprint of Edwin O’Connor’s great and indispensable novel of old-style American ward politics, Jack Beatty introduces readers to the serious comedy of The Last Hurrah.

Requiem with Yellow Butterflies: The World Mourns García Márquez

April 1st, 2016
Requiem with Yellow Butterflies: The World Mourns García Márquez

How do we memorialize a literary titan who shaped his own mythology? The story of legendary writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez gained its protean final chapter in the wave of obituaries after his death in 2014.

Answer in Paradox

April 1st, 2016
Answer in Paradox

An intimate new biography gives us a Charlotte Brontë for our times – and raises questions about the entanglement of life and art.

A Question of Character

April 1st, 2016
A Question of Character

In an entertaining new study of Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir and company, the existentialist movement becomes a personality-driven piece of public performance.

It’s a Mystery: “Good fortune rarely walks you out the door to your car”

April 1st, 2016
It’s a Mystery: “Good fortune rarely walks you out the door to your car”

The 11th novel in Philip Kerr’s Bernie Gunther series and the 2nd novel in John Lawton’s Joe Wilderness series share plenty of thrills and character insights in common.

From the Archives: Claiming the Future

April 1st, 2016
From the Archives: Claiming the Future

Julio Cortázar and Gabriel Garcia Marquez brought Latin American fiction to the attention of the world. Now a young crop of writers are trying to move beyond magical realism–a new anthology charts the diverse approaches.

From the Archives: The Quiet One

April 1st, 2016
From the Archives: The Quiet One

Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is usually overshadowed by her sisters’ masterpieces, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, but this gripping novel, a startling exposé of Victorian patriarchy, deserves a turn in the spotlight.

Book Review: High Dive

March 9th, 2016
high dive

A 1984 assassination attempt on Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher forms the unlikely backdrop for Jonathan Lee’s US debut novel

Book Review: The Year of the Runaways

March 5th, 2016
yera of the runaways

A complex and moving novel about a trio of young men who leave their native India in search of work

Both Sides, Now

March 1st, 2016
Both Sides, Now

If everybody’s a critic, as New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott claims in his new book, then where does that leave criticism? Sam Sacks reviews.

Mirror Writing

March 1st, 2016
Abani

There are two kinds of essayists: explainers and explorers. Which populate the new series from Restless Books about the human face? John Cotter investigates.

I Am Jack’s Contested Legacy

March 1st, 2016
I Am Jack’s Contested Legacy

The book Fight Club – and even more so the movie adaptation – have cult fixtures in American culture. But after twenty years, is there anything left for a sequel to subvert? Justin Hickey reads Fight Club 2.

Another Way To See

March 1st, 2016
Another Way To See

John Berger’s writing on art often feels more dramatic than analytic, a passionate study of the unspoken transaction between artist and viewer. Robert Minto looks at Portraits.

The Loneliest Number

March 1st, 2016
The Loneliest Number

Is loneliness a failure, or just a sign that one is alive? Olivia Laing’s new book explores the paradox of being alone in one of the world’s most crowded cities.

Punching Up

March 1st, 2016
Punching Up

Can fiction be overtly political without becoming doctrinaire? A new novel about the Seattle W.T.O. protests succeeds by emphasizing the human complexities involved.

Here to Write

March 1st, 2016
Here to Write

Kay Boyle, friend to William Carlos Williams, Katherine Anne Porter, and Samuel Beckett, was famous for her short stories but also wrote a lifetime’s worth of fascinating letters, now sampled in a new anthology.

Creole to Queen’s English

March 1st, 2016
Creole to Queen’s English

The richly diverse voices in A Brief History of Seven Killings paved the way for the novel’s success, but does the whole justify up to the hype?

It’s a Mystery: “It’s always good to know whatever the enemies of your enemies are after”

March 1st, 2016
It’s a Mystery: “It’s always good to know whatever the enemies of your enemies are after”

Locations don’t get much different than the Venice of Donna Leon and the Duluth of Brian Freeman, but as two new mysteries show, they have one thing in common: murder!

Book Review: The Vatican Princess

February 27th, 2016
vatican princess

A new historical novel joins the ranks of those trying to rehabilitate the reputation of poor Lucrezia Borgia

Book Review: The Lightkeepers

February 18th, 2016
lightkeepers

Many kinds of violence haunt a remote California island chain when a nature photographer takes a one-year assignment there

Book Review: The Deep Sea Diver’s Syndrome

February 15th, 2016
deep sea diver’s syndrome

Popular French science-fantasy writer Serge Brussolo gets makes his debut appearance in English with a story of men and women who treasure-hunt in the dreams of other people

Book Review: Dog Run Moon

February 10th, 2016
callan wink

The debut short story collection from a Montana fly-fishing guide

Book Review: The Good Liar

February 1st, 2016
the good liar

Nicholas Searle’s debut novel stars a canny old swindler who may or may not have found has final, perfect mark

Sentience Over Skin

February 1st, 2016
Sentience Over Skin

In a distant future without humans, genetically engineered members of other Earth species have evolved societies of staggering – and problematic – complexity.

No Storm of Roses

February 1st, 2016
No Storm of Roses

Lilliet Berne, hero of Alexander Chee’s highly-anticipated new novel Queen of the Night, enjoys the glamorous life of a diva — but what’s below the surface is both more sordid and more tragic.

It’s a Mystery: “You can choose forgiveness or revenge, but revenge is always costly”

February 1st, 2016
It’s a Mystery: “You can choose forgiveness or revenge, but revenge is always costly”

In two new mysteries – one the start of a new series, one the start of a new career – intricate plots take readers from Upstate New York to the Northern Cascades.

Book Review: The Ex

January 30th, 2016
the ex

A name from a hotshot defense attorney’s past comes back to haunt her when she discovers her ex is a suspect in a triple homicide

Book Review: Lay Down Your Weary Tune

January 27th, 2016
lay down

An out-of-work musician is hired to ghost-write the memoirs of a legendary blues singer, but the legend hides some grim new realities

Book Review: Bull and Other Stories

January 22nd, 2016
bull and other stories

Misfits and battered believers fill the pages of Kathy Anderson’s wise and funny debut

Book Review: Jakob’s Colors

January 14th, 2016
jakob’s colors

The Nazi slaughter of hundreds of thousands of European gypsies forms the grim backdrop to Lindsay Hawdon’s debut novel

Book Review: The Bands of Mourning

January 13th, 2016
the bands of mourning

In the latest novel from hyper-prolific Brandon Sanderson, the vast mythos of his “Cosmere” is further expanded

Book Review: What Belongs to You

January 11th, 2016
what belongs to you

An American instructor in Bulgaria falls into a problematic infatuation with a rough-hewn rent-boy in Garth Greenwell’s debut novel

Book Review: The Norton Critical Lazarillo de Tormes

January 10th, 2016
norton lazarillo

The great Renaissance classic gets a spryly-translated new Norton edition

Book Review: Blood & Steel

January 9th, 2016
Book Review: Blood & Steel

In the third century, the Roman Empire teetered on the brink of implosion, with one man after another claiming power – and Harry Sidebottom’s “Throne of the Caesars” series transmutes it all into first-rate historical fiction

Book Review: The Happy Marriage

January 7th, 2016
the happy marriage

A bedridden famous painter reflects on his unhappy marriage – and his wife gets the last word

Book Review: Only the Stones Survive

January 6th, 2016
only the stones

In Morgan Llywelyn’s latest novel, the gods and goddesses of ancient Ireland take center stage

Book Review: The Gun

January 4th, 2016
the gun

A young man out for a nighttime walk in Tokyo finds a gun. Then he thinks about it all the time. Then he thinks about getting bullets for it. And then he thinks about firing it …

Our Editions, Ourselves

January 1st, 2016
Our Editions, Ourselves

How many copies of Middlemarch does one person need? When the edition is as lovely as this, there’s always room for one more.

“Darkly Luminous”: D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love

January 1st, 2016
“Darkly Luminous”: D. H. Lawrence’s <em>Women in Love</em>

The working title of D. H. Lawrence’s Women In Love was Dies Irae – Day of Wrath. But reading it will make you feel not despairing but vibrantly alive.

This Fatal Land

January 1st, 2016
This Fatal Land

Ukraine is a haunted, confounding country.Yuri Andrukhovych tries to match his prodigious technique to its complexity.

Romantics without Rebellion

January 1st, 2016
Romantics without Rebellion

In the 1930s, a handful of clubbable Christian scribblers got together for tea and conversation and produced both The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings. What on earth went on there?

It’s a Mystery: “It’s wonderful how well men can keep secrets they have not been told”

January 1st, 2016
It’s a Mystery: “It’s wonderful how well men can keep secrets they have not been told”

Complex plotting runs through a darkly humorous new caper from Thomas Perry and the third book in Mick Herron’s series about the disgraced spies at MI5’s Slough House.

Book Review: The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories

December 26th, 2015
big book of sherlock

A legendary editor assembles the biggest collection of Sherlock Holmes parodies, pastiches, and homages ever collected in one volume

Book Review: Reading The Tale of Genji

December 11th, 2015
reading the tale of genji

The Tale of Genji has been enthralling readers for a thousand years; a grand new book collects some of the varied critical responses it’s sparked over the centuries

The One Who Gets Wounded

December 1st, 2015
The One Who Gets Wounded

Adam Johnson’s stories cast us adrift in moral, emotional, even existential uncertainties; the only reassurance they offer lies in the excellence of the fiction itself.

Me Am Your Smallest Fan

December 1st, 2015
Me Am Your Smallest Fan

Long, long before Superman appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, human folklore was rife with super-beings. A new book takes a look at the more-than-human.

It’s a Mystery: “Love doesn’t visit often, even when it comes, it can always change its mind and walk away”

December 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “Love doesn’t visit often, even when it comes, it can always change its mind and walk away”

A promising debut joins to veteran onging series in a trio of new crime dramas spanning the globe from Santa Fe to Venice to Echo Park.

Pen and Tell Her

November 1st, 2015
Pen and Tell Her

Elizabeth Gilbert wants you to be creative, without fear. Whatever brings you to life, whether it’s learning a dance, writing a song, or drawing on the wall, just do it! But what if you want to review her book?

Friends on the Patio

November 1st, 2015
Friends on the Patio

Essayist, critic, novelist, and public gadfly: Gore Vidal’s long career took many forms and sprang from a life as dramatic as his work. Has that life finally found a biography to do it justice?

Never Have Hands Been So Vital to a Creature

November 1st, 2015
Never Have Hands Been So Vital to a Creature

In Zachary Thomas Dodson’s visionary and inventive debut novel, a violent past and a dystopian future are woven together into a tale of families, legacies … and bats. Justin Hickey reviews Bats of the Republic.

Insurrections of the Bland

November 1st, 2015
Insurrections of the Bland

The New Republic once embodied a vibrant, eclectic liberalism. A new anthology inadvertently tells a depressing story about the decline of that vision.

No Laughing Matter

November 1st, 2015
No Laughing Matter

In Timur Vermes’s bestselling novel, newly translated from the German, it’s 2011, the Führer is back, and he’s not happy at how the world has changed. Is it OK to find that funny?

It’s A Mystery: “The civilized people in the world are the most dangerous people on earth.”

November 1st, 2015
It’s A Mystery:  “The civilized people in the world are the most dangerous people on earth.”

A Banquet of Consequences is an elegant addition to Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley series. Bernard Minier’s mesmerizing The Circle more than fulfills the promise of last year’s auspicious debut The Frozen Dead. And Felix Francis just keeps getting better as he proves with Front Runner.

Book Review: The Annotated Poe

October 27th, 2015
annotated

A sumptuously illustrated and annotated new edition of the classic short works of Edgar Allan Poe

Book Review: In the Shadow of Edgar Allen Poe

October 13th, 2015
in the shadow of ea poe

A new anthology looks at the rich, creepy atmosphere that gave rise to the fiction of Edgar Allan Poe – and then was dominated by him as by no other author

Book Review: Hell’s Foundations Quiver

October 10th, 2015
hell’s foundations quiver

In the latest of David Weber’s “Safehold” novels, Industrial-Age technology is coming to a quasi-Renaissance world, ready or not

Book Review: Cleopatra’s Shadows

October 10th, 2015
cleopatra’s shadows

An effective debut novel looks at the story of famous Cleopatra’s much less-famous sisters

Book Review: 100 Years of the Best American Short Stories

October 3rd, 2015
100 years

A big new volume commemorates a century of “Best American Short Stories,” which began – as with all worthy things – in Boston a long time ago

Book Review: The Secret Chord

October 3rd, 2015
the secret chord

The author of such brilliant novels as “Year of Wonders” and “March” takes on the Biblical story of King David

Book Review: The Ville Rat

October 2nd, 2015
the ville rat

The odd couple military police sergeants Sueno and Bascom return in Martin Limon’s gripping new mystery set in 1970s Korea

Open Letters Bestseller List Feature 2015

October 1st, 2015
Open Letters Bestseller List Feature 2015

The Open Letters team of writers and editors divvies up the Fiction list of the venerable New York Times bestseller list and dives right in – with decidedly mixed reactions.

Open Letters Bestseller List Feature 2015 Continues

October 1st, 2015
Open Letters Bestseller List Feature 2015 Continues

The Open Letters Bestseller Feature continues, and the body-count rises!

Unstable Atoms

October 1st, 2015
Unstable Atoms

Anne-Marie MacDonald’s Adult Onset is full of extraordinary encounters. For Kerry Clare, some of them are between her own past and present, her life and her (re)reading.

Ecology of the Imagination

October 1st, 2015
Ecology of the Imagination

For over sixty years, the story of humanity’s weird fascination with UFOs has been unfolding across nations and societies. A new book goes beyond easy mockery to ask some, er, probing questions.

Border Reports

October 1st, 2015
Border Reports

How do we become ourselves? For Vivian Gornick, wandering the city streets is one way to both ask and answer that question; for us, her book becomes a bracing guide to doing the same.

It’s a Mystery: “We live in a world in which paranoia is a requirement”

October 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery:  “We live in a world in which paranoia is a requirement”

Three nifty new thrillers star some reigning champs of the genre: Lisbeth Salander, Jack Reacher, and James Bond.

Book Review: Quicksand

September 29th, 2015
quicksand

A failed writer seizes on a most unlikely inspiration for his great book: the catastrophically unlucky life of his best friend

Book Review: Those We Left Behind

September 22nd, 2015
those we left behind

In the latest crime novel from Stuart Neville, two young killers are getting paroled – much too soon for the son of their victim

Book Review: The Beautiful Bureaucrat

September 19th, 2015
beautiful bureaucrat

A slim new novel works hard at being clever, with mixed results. Justin Hickey reviews “The Beautiful Bureaucrat”

Book Review: The Murdstone Trilogy

September 17th, 2015
the murdstone trilogy

The author of several well-regarded but unprofitable novels about sensitive misfit boys turns to the industry’s top money-maker: epic fantasy. Disaster promptly ensues.

Book Review: Everland

September 17th, 2015
Book Review: Everland

In 2012, a trio of Antarctic explorers re-traces the path of a doomed expedition from 1913

Book Review: The Double Life of Liliane

September 12th, 2015
the double life of liliane

National Book Award-winner Lily Tuck’s latest book attempts an experiment at dramatizing her memories of her early years

Book Review: The Storms of War

September 7th, 2015
storms of waruk

In historian Kate Williams’ new novel, a wealthy family in England confronts the realities of the First World War

Book Review: A Clue to the Exit

September 4th, 2015
a clue to the exit

A sarcastic screenwriter learns he has only six months to live in this reprinted novel from Edward St. Aubyn from 2000

Book Review: The Desert and the Blade

September 3rd, 2015
the desert and the blade

In the latest chapter of S. M. Stirling’s “Emberverse” series, two courageous women embark on a quest for a supernatural sword

Book Review: Sorcerer to the Crown

September 3rd, 2015
sorcerer to the crown

In Zen Cho’s exuberant debut, the magic of Napoleonic-era England is slowly dwindling, and it’s up to the Sorcerer Royal to figure out why

Book Review: The Gates of Evangeline

September 1st, 2015
the gates of evangeline

A mother grieving the loss of her own son investigates the 30-year-old disappearance of a powerful Southern family’s little boy in this haunting debut

Romancing the Convention

September 1st, 2015
Romancing the Convention

Think romance novels aren’t worth taking seriously? The Romance Writers of America’s annual convention brings together thousands of smart, self-aware readers and writers ready and able to prove you wrong.

On Venusberg by Anthony Powell

September 1st, 2015
On <em>Venusberg</em> by Anthony Powell

Anthony Powell’s name is synonymous with his twelve-volume behemoth “A Dance to the Music of Time.” But he had a long and varied writing career, and his early novel Venusberg, Levi Stahl contends, is well worth searching out in the shade of “Dance.”

Learning How To Read: William Goldman’s The Temple of Gold

September 1st, 2015
Learning How To Read: William Goldman’s <em>The Temple of Gold</em>

In Stephen Akey’s personal essay, the sex and squalor of William Goldman’s The Temple of Gold appeals to the thirteen-year-old he was when he first encountered it – and prompts an adult reassessment.

Elena Ferrante and the Art of the Left Hand

September 1st, 2015
Elena Ferrante and the Art of the Left Hand

Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels — which form a sprawling epic about art, friendship, and power — are what Goethe called Weltliteratur: books that speak to the world, not just to a nation.

Boy, Interrupted

September 1st, 2015
Boy, Interrupted

For the protagonist of Jim Shepard’s heartbreaking novel The Book of Aron it is terrible to be a poor Jew in anti-Semitic prewar Poland – but it is hardest of all to be a child, at the mercy of everyone else.

Know Your Name

September 1st, 2015
Know Your Name

Game of Thrones is remarkably faithful to George R. R. Martin’s original epic series, except for one vital element: it transforms his subversive morality into conventional fantasy.

It’s a Mystery: “The only species that is dangerous to humans is other humans”

September 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “The only species that is dangerous to humans is other humans”

A mystery trio: Louise Penny’s 11th Gamache novel is a stellar addition to the series; Elsa Hart’s debut is a fine historical murder mystery set in 18th-century China; Bernhard Aichner’s first appearance in English is spine-chilling.

Book Review: Mycroft Holmes

August 31st, 2015
mycroft holmes

A debut adventure starring the smarter older brother of Sherlock Holmes

Book Review: Chasing the Phoenix

August 30th, 2015
chasing the phoenix

Michael Swanwick’s terrific new novel features a con artist and a genetically modified dog-man seeking riches and power in a post-post-apocalyptic China

Book Review: The Automobile Club of Egypt

August 30th, 2015
the automobile club of egypt

The celebrated author of “The Yacoubian Building” returns with another panoramic look at life in modern Egypt during a pivotal era

Book Review: The Daughters

August 29th, 2015
the daughters

In Adrienne Celt’s remarkably rich debut novel, an opera singer is worried that the birth of her daughter has robbed her of her singing voice

Book Review: The Trials

August 29th, 2015
the trials

In the wake of professional betrayal and global catastrophe, the heroes of Linda Nagata’s “Red” Trilogy are confronted by a new threat as the series barrels on

Book Review: Browsings

August 26th, 2015
Book Review: Browsings

Book critic Michael Dirda’s latest collection offers more personal musings on the subject he loves most

Book Review: Beirut, Beirut

August 23rd, 2015
beirut, beirut

Bloomsbury publishes a lovely new English-language translation of Sonallah Ibrahim’s great novel about the Lebanese Civil War

Book Review: The Casualties

August 23rd, 2015
the casualties

You wouldn’t bet on a little street in Edinburgh – or its eccentric inhabitants – surviving a series of world-battering catastrophes, but that’s both the starting and the ending point of Nick Holdstock’s fascinating first novel

Book Review: Under Tiberius

August 20th, 2015
under tiberius

In a dusty Vatican archive, an ancient manuscript is found that could change the world. Or whatever.

Book Review: No. 4 Imperial Lane

August 20th, 2015
no. 4 imperial lane

The woes of empire and the decline of the aristocracy form the backdrop for Jonathan Weisman’s smart and moving debut novel, set in Thatcher’s England.

Book Review: Still Life Las Vegas

August 18th, 2015
still life las vegas

In this funny and touching debut, a young man’s search for his missing mother leads to unexpected discoveries amid the lights of Las Vegas

Book Review: The Madagaskar Plan

August 17th, 2015
the madagaskar plan

In an alternate history in which an undefeated Nazi Germany controls vast portions of Africa, a cast of old friends and enemies come together amid rumors of a devastating new kind of bomb …

Book Review: Latest Readings

August 16th, 2015
latest readings

Ailing cultural critic Clive James turns in what may very well be his final collection of essays. Robert Minto reviews.

Book Review: The Red

August 15th, 2015
the red

The hero of Linda Nagata’s nifty new series is hard-wired to his battle-armor … but is something else hiding in the connection?

Book Review: Moral Agents

August 14th, 2015
moral agents

A collection of profiles of eight pivotal American literary men of the 20th century – Robert Minto reviews

Book Review: The Dinosaur Lords

August 10th, 2015
dinosaur lords cover

On the world of Paradise, the wars of dynasties are fought on battlefields by knights mounted on dinosaurs

Book Review: The Blooding

August 2nd, 2015
the blooding cover

Matthew Hawkwood, James McGee’s super-competent soldier-turned-spy, returns in another adventure, this time trapped in America during the War of 1812

Book Review: Brothers in Blood

August 1st, 2015
brothers in blood

In the latest Roman historical novel from old pro Simon Scarrow, two heroic legionaries are chasing an infamous local warlord in Britannia – and facing treachery from within their own ranks

Starship Captains Do It On Impulse (Unfortunately)

August 1st, 2015
Starship Captains Do It On Impulse (Unfortunately)

In fan-favorite Ernest Cline’s new book, a young man raised on video games and cheesy sci-fi movies finds that they just might be the key to Earth’s salvation. But is the 80’s nostalgia of Armada self-defeating?

The Edge of Sin

August 1st, 2015
The Edge of Sin

Robyn Cadwallader centers her debut novel on a young nun who volunteers to be walled away from all human contact for the rest of her life. Such women existed and, surprisingly, their lives were enormously full.

Eileen Chang’s Changes: from Love in Redland to Naked Earth

August 1st, 2015
Eileen Chang’s Changes: from <em>Love in Redland</em> to <em>Naked Earth</em>

Eileen Chang would never have written her hot-button anticommunist masterpiece Naked Earth without US Government encouragement and support. What should contemporary readers make of this?

“A Reputable Outlaw”

August 1st, 2015
“A Reputable Outlaw”

Was the duel at twenty paces a cancer on civil society or a gesture of defiance and an expression of individuality? Touche: The Duel in Literature looks to provide the reader satisfaction on that question.

The Happy Misanthrope

August 1st, 2015
The Happy Misanthrope

Milan Kundera’s newest and possibly final novel returns to the ideas he’s pursued across his career, including his “categorical disagreement with being.” Y. Greyman reviews.

It’s a Mystery: “It’s not important who fires the shot. It’s who pays for the bullet.”

August 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “It’s not important who fires the shot. It’s who pays for the bullet.”

From the Perigord region of France to North Yorkshire, England to the Appalachian Trail – the locations of this trio of new mysteries by old hands might be far-flung, but for our mystery maven, crime is a universal language!

Book Review: The Last Leaves Falling

July 25th, 2015
last leaves falling

A teenager in Kyoto tries to face the last months of his life as a samurai would – with a little help from his friends

Book Review: The Meursault Investigation

July 25th, 2015
meursault investigation

The famous bloody encounter at the center of Albert Camus’ novel The Stranger is re-imagined from a new perspective in Kamel Daoud’s widely-praised debut

Book Review: The Black Coat

July 23rd, 2015
black-coat-new-web

In the wake of Bangladesh’s bloody Liberation War, a hapless nonentity suddenly finds himself impersonating a beloved national leader

Book Review: The Fall

July 22nd, 2015
the fall

Federal contractor Jack Taylor takes an unprecedented high-altitude space jump – but when he breaks the sound barrier and makes his landing, he finds himself in a different reality

Book Review: Last First Snow

July 21st, 2015
last first snow

In Max Gladstone’s latest “Craft” sequence novel, what looks like a straightforward neighborhood gentrification suddenly threatens to unleash the wrath of the gods themselves

Book Review: The Year’s Best Science Fiction, 2015

July 20th, 2015
Various-YearsBestSF32-Blog

The latest monumental anthology from Gardner Dozois of the best the sci-fi genre has to offer

Book Review: Dark Orbit

July 14th, 2015
dark orbit cover

A distant planet crackling with “dark energy” holds mind-boggling secrets for the crew of humans sent to explore it

Book Review: Pretty Is

July 11th, 2015
prettty is cover

Years ago, two young girls were abducted and held for two months by a mysterious stranger; in the present, in Maggie Mitchell’s terrific debut novel, these women are now confronted with the suspicion that a part of their childhood ordeal is very much alive.

Book Review: Time Salvager

July 10th, 2015
time salvager

In the future, a vast corporation sends operatives back in time to loot the past, and those operatives have one rule above all others: bring nobody back with you. When one of those operatives breaks that rule, Wesley Chu’s novel takes off

Book Review: The Lagoon

July 10th, 2015
lagoon cover

When enigmatic aliens plunge down in the ocean off the coast of Nigeria, three very different humans encounter them – and watch as the world is changed forever

Book Review: The War at the Edge of the World

July 8th, 2015
war at the edge cover

A decorated Roman soldier accompanies a dangerous mission into barbarian territory in 4th century Britain

Book Review: The Captive Condition

July 7th, 2015
the captive condition cover

The forgotten Midwestern town of Normandy Falls becomes the setting for an increasingly horrifying – and surreal – series of events in Kevin Keating’s outstanding new novel

Book Review: Hostile Takeover

July 6th, 2015
hostile takeover cover

In “Hostile Takeover,” Shane Kuhn provides a raucous follow-up to his popular novel “The Intern’s Handbook”

Book Review: The Insect Farm

July 6th, 2015
the insect farm cover

Two brothers – one simple-minded, the other quite possibly devious – are at the heart of Stuart Prebble’s new thriller

Book Review: The Summer of Good Intentions

July 3rd, 2015
the summer of good intentions cover

Three sisters and their various husbands and children gather at the family’s inviting old Cape Cod vacation home, where they face drama, revelation, heartache, and maybe personal re-invention.

Book Review: Newport

July 3rd, 2015
newport cover

A wealthy family in dazzling 1920s Newport, Rhode Island faces problems and revelations in both the material world of their huge estate – and also in the spirit world, where secrets will be revealed

Book Review: The Exchange of Princesses

July 3rd, 2015
the exchange of princesses cover

In the early 1720s, the regent of France risked both his young king and his young daughter on high-stakes international gambles in the ongoing War of Succession; a sparkling new novel dramatizes the events

Peer Review: Front Row Seats

July 1st, 2015
Peer Review: Front Row Seats

Biographer Zachary Leader takes his readers on a long, detailed tour of the first half of Saul Bellow’s life, and while those readers may be loving it, the critics have been complaining!

The Truth of a Thing

July 1st, 2015
The Truth of a Thing

Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life emphasized the contingency of any single story. In contrast, her new novel focuses on one life lived to the full. But for better or for worse, Atkinson can’t resist the lure of metafiction…

The Whip Descends

July 1st, 2015
The Whip Descends

Why do we read the same story over and over? In Virginia Woolf’s case, it’s to learn again how great art emerged from her strange life of privilege and grief.

The Book and the Boy

July 1st, 2015
The Book and the Boy

A thousand years ago, a refined lady at the Japanese Court wrote the first and one of the greatest novels of all time, The Tale of Genji; Dennis Washburn does the latest translation of this immense work, with stunning results.

A Moon, A Girl … Romance!

July 1st, 2015
A Moon, A Girl … Romance!

Sure, we all know Superman, Wonder Woman, and Spider-Man – but what about the also-rans? Who played the Captain and Tennille to the Avengers’ Sonny and Cher? Zach Rabiroff looks at the heroes who didn’t quite make the prime-time cut.

All Our Revels Ended

July 1st, 2015
All Our Revels Ended

For decades, famed academic and critic Harold Bloom has been tilting against the windmills of cultural fads and forgettings. But in his latest (and last?) book, he strikes a different pose.

It’s a Mystery: “Trust is the mother of deceit”

July 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “Trust is the mother of deceit”

A trio of mysteries cum thrillers from Stephen King, Peter Lovesey, and Mike Lawson—each one in its own way stylish, suspenseful, and sharp.

Classics Reissued: A Legacy

June 30th, 2015
a legacy cover

Sybille Bedford’s great novel – now in a pretty reprint from the New York Review of Books – has the sweep of Edward Gibbon and the emotional vitality of Jane Austen. Robert Minto takes a new look at a classic.

Book Review: People of the Songtrail

June 29th, 2015
people of the song trail

Fifteen hundred years ago, the inhabitants of northeastern Canada encounter intruders from over the sea: Vikings

Book Review: The Melody Lingers On

June 27th, 2015
the melody lingers on cover

A rich investment swindler disappears on his boat – and with a great chunk of his ill-gotten gains – and the plot is afoot in the latest thriller from Mary Higgins Clark

Book Review: Byron’s Letters & Journals

June 20th, 2015
byron’s letters

Byron the poet was also Byron the prolific correspondent and diarist, as a generous and learned new collection amply demonstrates

Book Review: The Change

June 18th, 2015
dies the fire

In a generous new anthology, a group of talented authors tells stories set in the “Emberverse” of S. M. Stirling – an Earth where all technology has abruptly stopped working

Book Review: Margaret of Anjou

June 17th, 2015
margaret of anjou cover

In Iggulden’s ongoing series about the Wars of the Roses, England’s Queen Margaret struggles to hold onto her power – and her life – even as her husband the king slips in and out of sanity

Book Review: In the Unlikely Event

June 17th, 2015
in the unlikely event cover

A New Jersey town repeatedly struck by falling planes is the setting for Judy Blume’s new book

Book Review: Storm and Steel

June 16th, 2015
blood_and_iron

A former slave in a brutal empire is now wielding both political and magical power the second volume in Jon Sprunk’s hugely enjoyable “Book of the Black Earth” series

Book Review: Death and Mr. Pickwick

June 15th, 2015
death and mr pickwick cover

An ambitious debut novel explores the world that gave birth to the meteoric career of Charles Dickens and his lesser-known competitors

Book Review: The Islanders

June 12th, 2015
the islanders cover

A woman dies in Versailles, and her death sets in motion a tangled plot connecting a small group of people in this 2010 novel by Pascal Garnier

Book Review: The Wolf Border

June 9th, 2015
wolf border cover

The effort of an eccentric earl to re-introduce wolves to England draws a zoologist back to the home she left years before

Book Review: The Unfortunates

June 7th, 2015
the unfortunates cover

The steely matriarch of a wealthy family is losing both her health and her control over her family in this sharp debut novel by Sophie McManus

Yes, Dear

June 1st, 2015
Yes, Dear

Hausfrau is a grim addition to the array of contemporary novels exploring an old theme: women’s discontent. Rebecca Hussey reviews.

Nobody’s Novel

June 1st, 2015
Nobody’s Novel

In Anna North’s new novel, many narrative voices attempt to tell the story of film director Sophie Stark – but can any number of perspectives reveal an essentially unknowable character? Katie Gemmill reviews.

Scala or Piolo? The Painstaking Brilliance of Alessandro Manzoni

June 1st, 2015
<em>Scala or Piolo?</em> The Painstaking Brilliance of Alessandro Manzoni

Poet, dramatist, and author of the great Italian novel I promessi sposi, Alessandro Manzoni led a life as fascinating as his fiction. Luciano Mangiafico tells the story of the Father of Italian Prose.

It’s a Mystery: “Delat’ iz mukhi slona, don’t make an elephant out of a fly”

June 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “<em>Delat’ iz mukhi slona</em>, don’t make an elephant out of a fly”

The dark, crime-ridden world of Putin’s Kremlin and Victorian Scotland Yard aren’t as different as you might think – as two gripping new mysteries demonstrate.

Book Review: The Eye Stone

May 22nd, 2015
the eye stone cover

A young monk goes on a desperate quest in the 12th century – to a fable city called Venetia

Book Review: An Ember in the Ashes

May 19th, 2015
an ember in the ashes cover

A plucky, unlikely teen heroine and a brooding, idealistic teen hero form an unlikely relationship as they fight the oppression of their world in … well, every single YA novel ever written, including this one.

Book Review: The Vorrh

May 14th, 2015
the vorrh us cover

At the heart of this astounding work of fantasy broods a jungle called the Vorrh, a forest so unending that it warps time and steals souls.

Book Review: Colossus

May 11th, 2015
Colossus_MECH_01.indd

An Indian driver and his enormous war-elephant experience the treacheries and triumphs of Alexander the Great’s Babylon campaign

Book Review: Corsair

May 10th, 2015
corsair cover

In the new novel from James Cambias, a space pirate in the near future – and the enforcer hunting him – encounter something neither one expects

Book Review: When the Heavens Fall

May 9th, 2015
when the heavens fall

When a renegade mage steals a powerful book of sorcery, the world of Marc Turner’s fantasy debut is plunged into a disturbing new form of warfare

Book Review: You Will Never Find Me

May 4th, 2015
you will never find me cover

Charles Boxer and Mercy Danquah are both kidnap specialists who’ve solved many tough cases. But in their latest, the missing person is their own daughter – and she doesn’t want to be found

Book Review: The Death’s Head Chess Club

May 4th, 2015
death’s head chess club cover

Two men meet by chance in a 1960s cafe – and remember a time twenty years earlier when they were captor and prisoner at Auschwitz

Book Review: Vanishing

May 4th, 2015
vanishing cover

Is the artist painting heath landscapes in England during World War II a mild-mannered hero of military campaigns or a spy? Gerard Woodward’s spellbinding novel starts there and then travels over the whole of an improbable life story

Book Review: Where I’m Reading From

May 3rd, 2015
where i’m reading from cover

The Tim Parks essays collected in this pretty volume range over the whole landscape of the book-world, from endangered copyright to foreign-lit chic to the inescapability of Jonathan Franzen

Book Review: Lords of the Sith

May 1st, 2015
lords of the sith cover

In the latest Star Wars novel, Darth Vader and his evil Emperor are trapped on a hostile world, being hunted by man and beast

The Great Blacksby

May 1st, 2015
The Great Blacksby

If Richard Pryor had spent time in the ghettos of L.A. County and had any interest in writing a novel, he might have come up with a book like Paul Beatty’s The Sellout: a beautifully offensive meditation on riches and race.

Second Glance: Fatal Beauty

May 1st, 2015
Second Glance: Fatal Beauty

Nothing shakes up the literary establishment like women writers — or women readers — who won’t stay quietly in their place.

“Are You Living or Dead?”

May 1st, 2015
“Are You Living or Dead?”

Usually Kazuo Ishiguro’s narrators implicate us in their world, reminding us of all we have in common. But in his new novel we are strangers looking at an unrecognizable landscape.

It’s a Mystery: “The person with the secret is the person with the power”

May 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “The person with the secret is the person with the power”

Donna Leon’s 24th book starring the charismatic Commissario Guido Brunetti, Falling in Love, is every bit as spellbinding as we expect it to be. Martin Walker’s seventh featuring Bruno, Dordogne’s favorite chief of police, The Children Return, finds his small town shockingly targeted by a terrorist network.

Book Review: Of Noble Family

April 25th, 2015
of noble family cover

Mary Robinette Kowal’s sparkling “Glamourist” fantasy series comes to a complex and intriguing conclusion

Book Review: Lucky Alan and Other Stories

April 21st, 2015
lucky alan cover

Jonathan Lethem’s latest book continues his project of combining the literary and the pulpy – Robert Minto reviews.

Book Review: How To Carry Bigfoot Home

April 19th, 2015
how to carry bigfoot home cover

Giant eels, dragon-scammers, and of course Sasquatch himself feature in Chris Tarry’s delightfully gonzo debut short story collection

Book Review: The Dream Lover

April 19th, 2015
the dream lover cover

The passionate, unconventional life of novelist George Sand forms the backdrop for Elizabeth Berg’s new novel

Book Review: The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering

April 17th, 2015
the only words cover

In the dystopian future of Jeffrey Rotter’s fantastic novel, Copernican astronomy has been forgotten – but its secrets lie buried under what was once Florida

Book Review: Lurid & Cute

April 15th, 2015
lurid & cute cover

The main character of Adam Thirlwell’s new novel has no redeeming qualities whatsoever – and he’s sinfully easy to read about

Protean Things

April 8th, 2015
Protean Things

Hilary Mantel’s best-selling Tudor novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, have made their way to the stage on the expert handling of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Zach Rabiroff had front row center.

Book Review: The Last Word

April 2nd, 2015
last word cover

The incestuously-close relationship between a literary biographer and his subject lies at the heart of Hanif Kureishi’s new novel

“Il n’y a pas d’Israël pour moi”

April 1st, 2015
“Il n’y a pas d’Israël pour moi”

In Michel Houellebecq’s uncannily timely new novel, the triumph of an Islamist government relieves the dreary banality that defines the secular France of the 21st century.

Thinking in Quotations

April 1st, 2015
Thinking in Quotations

On its schematic blueprints, the latest book by noted literary polymath Alberto Manguel is “about” Dante’s Divine Comedy – but as Robert Minto discovers, this author is at his best when he’s digressing.

Unconditional

April 1st, 2015
Unconditional

An Orwellian dystopia, a deposed humanity, and a cat passionately in love with a dog – Justin Hickey reviews Robert Repino’s fiendishly clever novel Mort(e).

Ruins, Mourning, and Cigarettes

April 1st, 2015
Ruins, Mourning, and Cigarettes

Set in the precarious territory between fiction and history, Nicolas Rothwell’s beautiful, haunting Belomor explores the ways storytelling serves as an impetus for self-discovery.

Realism and Russia’s Fate

April 1st, 2015
Realism and Russia’s Fate

The star translating team of Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (aided this time by Richard Nelson) translate Turgenev’s A Month in the Country, with predictably disruptive results. Jack Hanson reviews.

It’s a Mystery: “Sit on the fence and people get killed behind it”

April 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “Sit on the fence and people get killed behind it”

Two grand novels of crime and passion from a pair of stars in the field: The Lady from Zagreb by Philip Kerr and Dennis Lehane’s World Gone By.

Book Review: We All Looked Up

March 27th, 2015
we all looked up cover

The high school students in Tommy Wallach’s fantastic debut face more than graduation and an uncertain job market: they face an honest-to-gosh killer asteroid

Book Review: The Architect’s Apprentice

March 25th, 2015
architect’s apprentice cover

A young boy and his gorgeous white elephant become apprenticed to the greatest architect of the Ottoman Empire in this stunning new novel by the author of “The Bastard of Istanbul”

Book Review: On Elizabeth Bishop

March 24th, 2015
on elizabeth bishop cover

In the latest Princeton “Writers on Writers” installment, novelist Colm Toibin writes about poet Elizabeth Bishop

Book Review: Duplicity

March 23rd, 2015
duplicity cover

In N. K. Traver’s exciting debut, a young cyber-hacker finds his life steadily being commandeered – but his own reflection in the mirror.

Book Review: The Fifth Heart

March 18th, 2015
fifth heart cover

In Dan Simmons’ latest fantastic novel, Henry James finds himself teamed up with fiction’s most famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, in order to solve a very real – and very heartbreaking – mystery.

Book Review: The War That Used Up Words

March 17th, 2015
the war that used up words

At the outbreak of the First World War, American writers flocked to Europe and headed for the Western Front in order to find their Muse – and to make some quick cash. A new book follows a handful of these earliest chroniclers

Book Review: The Wide World’s End

March 15th, 2015
wide-worlds-end

In the concluding volume of James Enge’s gripping fantasy trilogy, a band of unlikely heroes is caught between warring godlike beings in a world quickly tearing itself apart

Book Review: Those Who Write For Immortality

March 13th, 2015
those who write cover

“I don’t want to achieve immortality through my work,” Woody Allen famously quipped; “I want to achieve immortality through not dying.” Robert Minto reviews a new book on what it takes to make it big in the literary afterlife

Book Review: The Red Queen

March 13th, 2015
red_queen_book_cover_a_p

In a dystopian future, a plucky young woman from a poor village suddenly finds herself at the heart of the corrupt power system and the focal point of a rebellion in “The Hunger Ga-” um, in Victoria Aveyard’s “The Red Queen.”

Book Review: Oscar Wilde’s Chatterton

March 10th, 2015
the death of chatterton

For over a century, Oscar Wilde’s notebook on Thomas Chatterton has been regarded as a ‘smoking gun’ of Wilde’s plagiaristic tendencies. A new book radically re-examines the issue

Book Review: The Tapestry

March 9th, 2015
the tapestry cover

Joanna Stafford – niece of an executed man and distant cousin to King Henry VIII – is called to court, where she immediately becomes the focal point of deadly intrigues

Book Review: John the Pupil

March 8th, 2015
john the pupil cover

Three impressionable young 13th-century Franciscans embark on an improbably odyssey to bring a momentous manuscript to the Pope

Book Review: The Violent Century

March 7th, 2015
Tidhar-ViolentCenturyUS-Blog

In a world very much like our own, super-powered clandestine operatives vie with each other on missions to save or destroy humanity

Book Review: Lady of the Eternal City

March 2nd, 2015
lady of the eternal city cover

Sabina, the wife of the enigmatic Roman emperor Hadrian, is beset by enemies in Rome – and safeguards a secret they’d all kill to know …

Book Review: Barbarian Spring

March 1st, 2015
barbarian spring cover

A businessman is on a trip to new-money Tunisia when the world’s economy goes into meltdown…

Shallow Sargasso Sea

March 1st, 2015
Shallow Sargasso Sea

Can you improve on a classic? A new novel retells George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda — but much more is lost than gained in the attempt.

Inheritance of Anger

March 1st, 2015
Inheritance of Anger

The great Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa claims he became a writer in order to annoy his father; his new novel takes up this age-old theme of the strife between fathers and sons.

Kafka with a Happy Ending

March 1st, 2015
Kafka with a Happy Ending

As we should expect from someone whose previous work is both experimental and kinky, Miranda July has written a first novel that refuses to play by the rules.

Pros and Con Men

March 1st, 2015
Pros and Con Men

Despite his iconic status today, in the 19th century Sherlock Holmes was neither the alpha nor the omega of crime fighters: a fascinating new book introduces us to his many contemporaries.

Leviathan in the Offing

March 1st, 2015
Leviathan in the Offing

Ron Howard’s adaptation of Nathaniel Philbrick’s bestselling In the Heart of the Sea will soon appear, but even the trailers raise rich questions: Why does this story still have the power to fascinate? A Moby-Dick fan ponders.

Flail and Thrash

March 1st, 2015
Flail and Thrash

When we say of someone that they died too early, does this posit that there is a perfect time? How does the meaning of a life change the longer it’s lived. Jenny Erpenbeck’s new novel End of Days explores some answers.

The Familiar is Strange

March 1st, 2015
The Familiar is Strange

Stalking the pages of Thomas Pierce’s debut story collection, where the surreal shares quarters with the ordinary, are dwarf mammoths, genetically modified guard dogs, baby Pippin monkeys, and a parakeet named Magnificent.

It’s a Mystery: “Danger is the spur of all great minds”

March 1st, 2015
It’s a Mystery: “Danger is the spur of all great minds”

The Friendship of Criminals by Robert Glinski is a fresh, original and totally entertaining perspective on mob relationships; A Murder of Magpies is Judith Flanders deliciously wry take on murder and publishing.

Book Review: The Girl on the Train

March 1st, 2015
girl on the train cover

In this New York Times bestseller, a hapless woman spots a mysterious event from the window of her commuter train and is soon caught up in a police investigation.

Book Review: Hereward – The End of Days

February 24th, 2015
End-of-Days-cover

Driven into hiding by the victorious forces of William the Conqueror, the heroic Hereward the Wake and his band of freedom fighters must struggle to survive

Book Review: The Accidental Empress

February 21st, 2015
accidental empress cover

A strong-willed Bavarian princess captures the eye of the young Austro-Hungarian emperor in Allison Pataki’s opulent new historical novel. Steve Donoghue reviews.

Book Review: The Just City

February 18th, 2015
the just city cover

In Jo Walton’s latest novel, the “just city” of Plato’s Republic is brought to life via Greek gods, robots, and a little discreet time travel

Book Review: Kings and Emperors

February 18th, 2015
kings and emperors cover

In Dewey Lambdin’s latest rousing Alan Lewrie adventure, our dashing hero sees action off the coast of a Spain imperiled by Napoleon

Book Review: A Darker Shade of Magic

February 16th, 2015
A Darker Shade final for Irene

In V. E. Schwab’s new fantasy novel, a young man can travel between a string of alternate-reality Londons

Book Review: Making Nice

February 13th, 2015
making nice cover

In Matt Sumell’s debut, his main character manages to alienate every other person in the book, often by punching them.

Book Review: Table Talk

February 11th, 2015
table talk cover

For twenty-five years, the “Table Talk” feature of The Threepenny Review has offered occasional musings on a wide range of topics by some of the best freelance writers and critics in the business. A new hardcover collects a generous helping of highlights

Book Review: Amherst

February 9th, 2015
amherst cover

When a 21st-century woman travels to the hometown of Emily Dickinson, she finds herself caught between a passionate present and a past far more human than she imagined

Book Review: The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac

February 8th, 2015
sas cover

In the very engaging latest from Sharma Shields, one family has a very unusual encounter with the legendary Bigfoot

Book Review: The Great Zoo of China

February 8th, 2015
the great china zoo cover

A small group of Americans visit a super-secret Chinese nature-park with a very unusual star attraction.

Book Review: Turtle Face and Beyond

February 5th, 2015
turtle face and beyond

The author of “Dogwalker” returns with a new collection of interlinked short stories that revel in their own straight-faced absurdity

Book Review: Unbecoming

February 4th, 2015
unbecoming cover

In this arresting debut, a young woman working in Paris is hiding from her past – and she worries that the old friends she betrayed are hunting her.

Outrunning the Constables

February 1st, 2015
Outrunning the Constables

To shut down his internal censors, Karl Ove Knausgaard wrote My Struggle at the astounding rate of over a thousand pages a year. The result is fiction that is vibrantly alive.

“Why, It’s I!”

February 1st, 2015
“Why, It’s I!”

Any new translation of a classic like Anna Kareninainevitably raises an awkward question: what was wrong with all the old translations? Debut writer Zach Rabiroff takes it line-by-line

The Buildup of Erasure

February 1st, 2015
The Buildup of Erasure

Claudia Rankine articulates the truths of the black experience so poignantly in her celebrated collection Citizen by putting them, paradoxically, both plainly and artfully.

Book Review: The extraordinary journey of the fakir who got trapped in an Ikea wardrobe

January 31st, 2015
extraordinary journe cover

A slim picaresque novel that was a runaway bestseller in France gets a stylish English-language translation

Book Review: Galapagos Regained

January 26th, 2015
Galapagos Regained

A true believer in the tenets of Darwinism in the 19th Century goes on what amounts to a pilgrimage to that great Darwinian destination, the Galapagos Islands, in James Morrow’s glowing new novel

Book Review: White Plague

January 22nd, 2015
whtie plague cover

Only one man can possibly save a plague- and fire-stricken sub that’s burning and adrift at the top of the world …

Book Review: Unbreakable

January 21st, 2015
unbreakable cover art by stephanie martiniere

When young Promise’s family is killed on their peaceful frontier planet, she signs up with the space-Marines – as one tends to do in such circumstances

Book Review: The Whispering Swarm

January 19th, 2015
the whispering swarm cover

The legendary fantasy author Michael Moorcock returns after a long absence to the genre he helped to create

Book Review: Sympathy for the Devil

January 12th, 2015
Book Review: Sympathy for the Devil

Michael Mewshaw comes not to praise Gore Vidal but to bury him in this new memoir of a friendship that did not outlast Mr. Vidal’s funeral.

Noble Rot

January 1st, 2015
Noble Rot

Horror fiction may not at first compare with more respectable genres, but look a bit closer. Horror is one of the oldest emotions known to man, and the artists who’ve evoked it have been some of our most brilliant and most strange …

What Jona Knew

January 1st, 2015
What Jona Knew

It’s comforting to believe there are lessons to be learned from the Holocaust, or to treat it as a story about the triumph of the human spirit. Jona Oberski’s Childhood rightly refuses us these consolations.

Title Menu: 6 Lyric Voices of Witness

January 1st, 2015
Title Menu: 6 Lyric Voices of Witness

The voice of poetry can often be the voice of lyric witness, turning our attention to moments in history that would have eluded us, or that might never have been felt as well as understood. These titles perform this function about as well as it can be done.

Short Tales on a Tight Rein

January 1st, 2015
Short Tales on a Tight Rein

The contemporary American short story is a kind of stunt double for the novel. Monica McFawn’s Bright Shards of Someplace Else is one such collection, each of its eleven stories posturing like a dare accepted.

Harm Him, Harm Me

January 1st, 2015
Harm Him, Harm Me

Historical novelist Andrew Levkoff stuffs the last installment of his “Bow of Heaven” trilogy with battles, love, loyalty betrayed, crucifixion, cross-purposes, loyalty regained, and deep reflections on what it all means.

Those Rascally Parthians! An Interview with author Andrew Levkoff

January 1st, 2015
Those Rascally Parthians! An Interview with author Andrew Levkoff

Open Letters Monthly interviews the author of Blood of Eagles, book three of the Bow of Heaven series.

James Wood and the Fall of Man

December 1st, 2014
James Wood and the Fall of Man

Book critic James Wood is a fascinating collection of contradictions: an apostate true believer, a champion of experimental fiction, an earnest searcher in empty temples. Sam Sacks reads one of our foremost readers.

A Long Time in the Making

December 1st, 2014
A Long Time in the Making

Nora Webster may be Colm Tóibín’s slightest novel yet, but his later novels are born from and echo this wise and intimate investigation of the interior life.

Double Consciousness

December 1st, 2014
Double Consciousness

Literature by post-Yugoslavian writers is often about identity in flux. That includes the books of David Albahari, one of the most widely read of contemporary Serbian authors and one of the most worth reading.

Something Beyond the Chaos

December 1st, 2014
Something Beyond the Chaos

The author made immortal by the novel Dune also wrote a career’s worth of short stories. Robert Minto looks at the first-ever complete collection of those stories.

The Fighter

December 1st, 2014
The Fighter

Norman Mailer was as fiery and mercurial a letter-writer as he was a novelist and journalist – and ten times as prolific. A big new volume collects the highlights of a lifetime in the post.

Keep on Losing

December 1st, 2014
Keep on Losing

Now back in print: an English translation of iconic Polish writer (and compulsive re-inventor of himself) Marek Hlasko’s most powerful novel.

“Cambridge should come to us”

December 1st, 2014
“Cambridge should come to us”

“Our belief in Literature has collapsed” Lars Iyer once wrote, but his new novel Wittgenstein Jr, the story of a passionate philosophy professor and his apathetic students, bristles with literary faith.

It’s a Mystery: “Irreverence is my only sacred cow”

December 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Irreverence is my only sacred cow”

A veteran and a newcomer give us two gripping thrillers: The Big Finish by the critically acclaimed master of suspense, James W. Hall, and The Life We Bury, a mesmerizing debut by Allen Eskens.

Stop Their World Spinning

November 1st, 2014
Stop Their World Spinning

Against a pervasive American sports culture, author Steve Allmond pits a devastating critique of the savage violence – and staggering toll in injuries and deaths – of football.

Title Menu: A list of great political books that doesn’t include What It Takes by Richard Ben Cramer

November 1st, 2014
Title Menu: A list of great political books that doesn’t include <em>What It Takes</em> by Richard Ben Cramer

Just in time for the November midterm elections, we do what doubters said couldn’t be done: we present you with a list of ten great political books that doesn’t include Richard Ben Cramer’s What It Takes.

The Attempt to See

November 1st, 2014
The Attempt to See

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Marilynne Robinson returns to small-town Iowa in this new novel full of deceptive calms and clear mastery.

More Faith, Better Grounded

November 1st, 2014
More Faith, Better Grounded

A reissue of James Agee’s letters to Father Flye give a picture of the writer’s naked ambition, excoriating self-hatred, and unrefined genius. But it also raises the question: Do we remember Agee more for what he wrote or what his addictions prevented him from writing?

It’s a Mystery: “Forgive your enemies but never forget their names”

November 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “Forgive your enemies but never forget their names”

Felix Francis continues to artfully follow in his late father’s footsteps with his newest thriller, Dick Francis’s Damage. The Button Man, Mark Pryor’s fourth Hugo Marston novel, is a prequel that adds a fascinating dimension to the highly charismatic protagonist of this splendid series.

Title Menu: 8 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Classics Hollywood Should Ignore

October 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 8 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Classics Hollywood Should Ignore

As Hollywood looks to science fiction and fantasy novels for the ‘source material’ of its newest CGI spectaculars, Justin Hickey picks ten sci-fi/fantasy books he hopes the studios never find and ruin …

Grosz Anatomy

October 1st, 2014
Grosz Anatomy

In his latest collection of essays, Theater of Cruelty, Ian Buruma launches a series of expert investigations into the springs of cruelty and the perils of victomhood.

Broken

October 1st, 2014
Broken

The wide-ranging themes of this wrenching novel are unified by imagery that links its heroine to an unexpected community of the traumatized living dead.

Terminal Lost and Found

October 1st, 2014
Terminal Lost and Found

Martin Amis’ new novel not only delves into the souls of a small group of characters involved in the running of concentration camp – it also interrogates the very nature of Holocaust fiction. Jack Hanson reads the latest from the author of Time’s Arrow.

Post Re-Bop

October 1st, 2014
Post Re-Bop

James Ellroy begins a second L.A. Quartet with his new novel Perfidia. But does it harness the demonic madness and stylistic panache of the author’s earlier works of historical crime fiction?

Coalition of the Chilling

October 1st, 2014
Coalition of the Chilling

A British historian’s richly-sourced accounting of Molotov-Ribbentrop offers fresh insights into this Nazi-Soviet pact of “non-aggression.”

John Domini’s Transformations

October 1st, 2014
John Domini’s Transformations

With literary criticism disappearing as a popular artform, we increasingly look to the book reviewer to do the critic’s work. A new collection by John Domini offers an example of reviews that transcend their form to provide analysis alongside mere evaluation.

It’s a Mystery: “Morality is like an industry, you use what you have”

October 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Morality is like an industry, you use what you have”

Sophie Hannah revives Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot with panache in The Monogram Murders, and Joe Gannon’s debut thriller Night of the Jaguar is a tightly wound, gut-wrenching read.

Peer Review: Elena Ferrante’s Hunger, Rebellion, and Rage

September 1st, 2014
Peer Review: Elena Ferrante’s Hunger, Rebellion, and Rage

The critical consensus around reclusive Italian novelist Elena Ferrante is enough to make you suspect collusion – but to what end? and at what cost? Rohan Maitzen reviews the reviewers.

Words Plucked from Our Tongues

September 1st, 2014
Words Plucked from Our Tongues

Can Joseph Boyden’s The Orenda heal Canada’s colonial relationship with its First Nations? Why should we expect literature to succeed where our leaders have failed?

All Manner of Damned-Fool-Bravery

September 1st, 2014
All Manner of Damned-Fool-Bravery

A disaffected British colonial officer with a yearning for heroism is relegated to a doomed imperial outpost where he meets a native boy with a yearning for heroes – and from this unlikely pairing, Nick Harkaway’s Tigerman weaves its fantastic, moving story.

A Kind of Humanity: Herzog at 50

September 1st, 2014
A Kind of Humanity: <em>Herzog</em> at 50

It’s been half a century since the appearance of Saul Bellow’s seminal novel Herzog – Jack Hanson revisits the work to see how Bellow’s various machinations have held up over time.

Call It His Soul

September 1st, 2014
Call It His Soul

Christopher Beha’s new novel Arts and Entertainments aims to be that weirdest of all things: a serious, even elegant, book about … reality television. As our reviewer reports, the oddity is that it was even attempted, and the wonder is that it succeeds so well.

A Walker in the City

September 1st, 2014
A Walker in the City

In the world of Julie Hayden’s stories, the contingency of all experience, let alone of literary creation and reputation, is inescapable.

It’s a Mystery: “Fear is a contagious disease”

September 1st, 2014
Stitched Panorama

A tightly drawn disturbing novel, The Frozen Dead is Bernard Minier’s auspicious debut. The Long Way Home is the tenth in Louise Penny’s celebrated Armand Gamache series.

Book Review: The Dog

August 2nd, 2014
the dog cover

A fascinating debut collection of short stories set in modern China

The Very Edge of Fiction

August 1st, 2014
The Very Edge of Fiction

Ben Lerner has followed his breakout novel Leaving the Atocha Station with a metafictional tale of a second-time novelist trying to throw a book together. Is it more than a game?

An Ignorant Highbrow

August 1st, 2014
An Ignorant Highbrow

If you think distinctions between ‘high’ and ‘low’ art are stuffy Victorian relics, our beleagured Stephen Akey says, you’re just not paying enough attention. So are you a highbrow? And should you be? And should everybody be?

Grand Affiliations

August 1st, 2014
Grand Affiliations

Metaphor: a tool for poets and rhetoricians, but also, perhaps, the way that people connect to the world at large. Lianne Habinek reviews a gamesome new study by the great literary critic Denis Donoghue.

Socrates Offside

August 1st, 2014
Socrates Offside

What place do deep questions about the meaning of life have in our technological age? Is philosophy more important than ever?

A Picture Book

August 1st, 2014
A Picture Book

Cover art from Omni, the new-age science mag of yore, is now a coffee table book: Giger, Frazetta, and Grant Wood are all here, but something crucial has been left out.

It’s a Mystery: “My world is a jungle of threats”

August 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “My world is a jungle of threats”

A Colder War is the latest from Charles Cumming, one of the best at depicting the frail and brutal world of spydom. Neely Tucker’s The Ways of the Dead marks the debut of what promises to be a first-rate series.

To Brave the Swollen Waters

August 1st, 2014
To Brave the Swollen Waters

Powerful South Korean writer Kyung-sook Shin’s second novel to be translated into English tells a touchingly human tale set in a world which, for most of her Western readers, could scarcely be more alien.

Dream-to-Desk

July 1st, 2014
Dream-to-Desk

Michael Cunningham’s beautiful new novel The Snow Queen follows the wisdom of fairy tales: its revelations occur at dusk, because the hour of despair is the most fertile of the day.

Beethoven in the Soul

July 1st, 2014
Beethoven in the Soul

Over time, the books of our youth make way for titles better suited to the grown-up readers we have become. But not all of them: YA or not, some books — such as K. M. Peyton’s Pennington trilogy — deserve a lasting place on our shelves.

Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

July 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

It’s summer at last, and you won’t find any relief from the heat in our editors’ round-up of the hottest books they know.

Wilson 2.0

July 1st, 2014
Wilson 2.0

Daniel Wilson’s first book, Robopocalypse was a straightforward adventure story about robots rising up against their human makers. His new book takes that simple premise and expands on it in complex and timely ways.

Passing Roncesvalles Again

July 1st, 2014
Passing Roncesvalles Again

The new Scribner “Hemingway Library” edition of The Sun Also Rises offers annotations, rough drafts, and alternate line-edits – but how much light does it shed on its “near-perfect work of fiction”?

It’s a Mystery: “It’s hard to be murdered for any reason”

July 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “It’s hard to be murdered for any reason”

Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane, those supersmart, sophisticated sleuths, are back in The Late Scholar, a savvy new detective story by Jill Paton Walsh.

Their Bloody Instruments

July 1st, 2014
Their Bloody Instruments

A ticking clock hangs ominously over every page of Craig DiLouie’s genuinely creepy new horror novel, filled with beings who aren’t quite zombies and not quite vampires. Our resident horror maven Deirdre Crimmins tells us all about it.

Title Menu: 8 More George Eliot Novels

June 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 8 More George Eliot Novels

Middlemarch is all the rage now – as it should be! But what if you’ve already read not just George Eliot’s masterpiece but all of her novels? Do not despair: these eight books will bring you close to her in spirit.

The Sun Was Bad

June 1st, 2014
The Sun Was Bad

Rusty Barnes’ debut novel Reckoning is both a hardbitten Appalachia noir and tender coming of age tale, both real art and real fun.

Coral Waxwork Classic

June 1st, 2014
Coral Waxwork Classic

Rjurik Davidson’s stunning debut – an epic of espionage, magic, and beasts migrated out of mythology – isn’t the sixth in a series, or the tenth, or the fifteenth; it’s that rare thing in the genre: a stand-alone novel

Absent Friends: Lean Years of Plenty

June 1st, 2014
Absent Friends: Lean Years of Plenty

For a little over two years, shortly before she died, short story master Katherine Mansfield wrote a weekly book review column. Those pieces not only shed light on Mansfield’s particular slant of genius, but have much to say about the embattled art of reviewing.

The 5 Commandments

June 1st, 2014
The 5 Commandments

Major Kolt “Racer” Raynor doesn’t salute the U.S. flag – it salutes him. He punches bad guys so hard their grandkids are born with bruises. He garrotted a terrorist using a string made from his own eyelashes. He stars in Dalton Fury’s action novel – and if you don’t read the book, he’ll know.

Dervishes and Gypsies

June 1st, 2014
Dervishes and Gypsies

Legendary Indian author Saadat Hasan Manto’s choicest short stories – depicting a teeming Bombay that’s both long-vanished and eternal – receive an attractive new paperback edition from Vintage International

It’s a Mystery: “Destiny is invincible; it always triumphs in the end”

June 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery: “Destiny is invincible; it always triumphs in the end”

Our mystery columnist looks at a highly anticipated debut, The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair by Joel Dicker, as well as the second novel in Jonathan Holt’s brilliant Carnivia trilogy, The Abduction.

The Important Difference

May 1st, 2014
The Important Difference

Is it really the immigrant writer’s job to represent third-world suffering for the sake of first-world catharsis? In All Our Names, Dinaw Mengestu resists the pressure to substitute autoethnography for art.

Title Menu: 8 books where bad decisions make good protagonists

May 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 8 books where bad decisions make good protagonists

Characters never go wrong when their poor life choices make for fascinating reading. Kathleen Rooney supplies us with eight unmissable examples.

The Selves in Ourself

May 1st, 2014
The Selves in Ourself

In Valeria Luiselli’s debut novel, a young Mexican woman imagines the real life of a long-dead man whose writings she has forged in the voice of a famous American poet. Then things get complicated.

So Why Write?

May 1st, 2014
So Why Write?

As the world’s supply of writers outpaces the world’s demand for their books, the financial returns for writing have fallen to laughable levels. Then why keep doing it? Paul Griffin explores the problem of writing and money.

It’s a Mystery: “The past lies like a nightmare upon the present”

May 1st, 2014
It’s a Mystery:  “The past lies like a nightmare upon the present”

A troika of mysteries—one a gripping debut, Precious Thing by Colette McBeth, the others superb new novels from two very special authors: Peter Robinson returns with Children of the Revolution and Donna Leon is back with By Its Cover.

The Ogre’s Guests

April 1st, 2014
The Ogre’s Guests

In his latest novel In Paradise Peter Matthiessen dramatizes a collision between the thoughtful philosophy of Zen and the worst of the 20th Century’s horrors.

The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit

April 1st, 2014
The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit

William S. Burroughs’s notorious Cut-up Trilogy was his fiercest broadside against what he felt was the tyranny of linear thought. Steve Danziger delves into their Word Hoard.

In the Land of the Free Brain

April 1st, 2014
In the Land of the Free Brain

“Your field is the mind, mine is the brain – will the twain ever meet?” Master novelist E. L. Doctorow’s latest deals with the traumas of duality.