Monthly Archives: June, 2010

Wednesday Moment of Zen: Another Kind of Strata

Of all the entries from New Blood 2010, the annual exhibition of the most innovative work from recent art and design graduates in the UK, my hands-down favorite is Gemma Dutfield’s A Geological Time Scale Book. I don’t have much information on the piece, other than the fact that Dutfield just received her BA in […]

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Dzanc Books Big Summer Sale

Amazonfail be damned—it’s far from the only game in town. Today while the big guy was twisting in the wind, I was busy getting my instant literary gratification over at Dzanc Books, where they’re having a terrific sale: two books for $17, three for $25, or four for $32, and no shipping charges. With a […]

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Hudson River’s Cool

Given this hot and soupy weather the east coast has been getting, I have to cast my lot with The Book Bench: When the heat begins to rise, I can only think of dipping in water. Over the past few days, I have been writing up a list of places to swim. It is unfortunate, […]

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MJ Rose’s Backstory: John Cotter

I used to play at being a writer. Afternoons in Boston, in my early 20s, I’d pour three fingers of Black Bush whiskey, feed a page into my typewriter, and surround my desk with books by whoever I was reading then—Bill Knott, Marguerite Duras—and add to that bibles and newspapers. I’d open to random pages […]

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“The Dog-Book” — Roger Grenier

And what if literature were a dog tagging along beside you night and day, a familiar and demanding animal that never leaves you in peace, that you must love, feed, take out? That you love and you hate. That hurts you by dying before you do, short as a book’s life is, these days. — […]

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In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659

In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659 by Anne Bradstreet I had eight birds hatcht in one nest, Four Cocks were there, and Hens the rest. I nurst them up with pain and care, No cost nor labour did I spare Till at the last they felt their wing, Mounted the Trees and learned […]

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Strata: Clarence Major

Clarence Major is a versatile author who revels in the energy found in words and language. He has written numerous novels and books of poetry, as well as two slang dictionaries. “If language didn’t change, it would die,” he said in an interview. His work has earned him a lengthy list of awards, including the […]

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Pocket Review: Merry Hall by Beverley Nichols

When it comes to my reading habits, I’m decidedly not an Anglophile. I don’t care much for cozies, the Royals leave me cold, and I’ve never had the hankering for a servant—I find that peculiar kind of class slapstick distasteful. So a book by a foppish confirmed bachelor on his trials and travails reclaiming a […]

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Everybody Loves the Sound of a Dog in the Distance

Quick, don’t think of a polar bear. And while you’re at it, good luck not stopping short at instances of barking dogs in the next 50 novels you read. In Slate, Rosecrans Baldwin points out what a widespread fictional convention the faraway dog bark is: Novelists can’t resist including a dog barking in the distance. […]

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Wednesday Moment of Zen: Popville

Because the world doesn’t provide most of us enough occasion for construction paper, scissors and glue, we have a few good souls making pop-up books. Popville has a really nice Ed Emberley vibe, and hopefully would stand up to a bunch of storytime sessions. Actually, it makes me think of Robert Crumb’s A Short History […]

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