Category Archives: Book Club

Tempest of the Headspace”: Margaret Atwood, Hag-Seed

“Also,” said Felix, “it’s on a universal theme.” What he had in mind was vengeance – that was certainly universal. He hoped she wouldn’t ask him about the theme: vengeance was so negative, was what she’d say. A bad example. Especially bad, considering the captive audience. Hag-Seed is one of a series of novels commissioned […]

“The Magic of the Island”: Gerald Durrell, My Family and Other Animals

Gradually the magic of the island settled over us as gently and clingingly as pollen. Each day had a tranquility, a timelessness about it, so that you wished it would never end. But then the dark skin of night would peel off and there would be a fresh day waiting for us, glossy and colourful […]

An American Story: Jane Smiley, Some Luck

My book club met last night to discuss Jane Smiley’s Some Luck. We didn’t choose it with this in mind, but it ended up feeling like a good choice to talk about the night before the American election, because it is pretty clearly meant not so much as a story about a particular American family as […]

Book Club Update: Moby-Dick Contains Multitudes

My book club met last night for the first of two sessions on Moby-Dick. For this one we read only about half way through, so a lot of our discussion either began or ended with some variation on “I wonder where this goes.” Does the novel as a whole uphold Ishmael’s endearing open-mindedness – or, for that […]

“Boldly Launched” — On My First Reading of Moby-Dick

Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harborless immensities. When I wrote about Madame Bovary here a couple of years ago, I commented that reading a very famous novel for the first time is like meeting a celebrity in person (or so I imagine). It is intensely […]

Dubious Comfort: Barbara Pym, Quartet in Autumn

There was something to be said for tea and a comfortable chat about crematoria. Early in Quartet in Autumn, Letty — one of the novel’s quartet of main characters — reflects on her past as an “unashamed reader of novels”: “she had come to realize,” we’re told, “that the position of an unmarried, unattached, ageing woman […]

Dogs and Cats

I’m back! It has been quite a week, and I still have work to do to finish up the term, but I can see my way through it now — and really, it hasn’t been that bad compared to terms when I’ve had more or bigger classes and no teaching assistants. Still, it feels good to have […]

Amis and Spenser and Scandal, Oh My!

It seems like too long since I wrote a detailed, thoughtful book post. Sadly, that’s not about to change! My activities for the past week or so have just been too miscellaneous, including my reading. I can’t really blame Joseph Anton, as I mostly turn to that late in the evening when I might otherwise be watching […]

“Encircled by Invisible Emotion”: Damon Galgut, Arctic Summer

This kind of companionship had far more value to Morgan than their few, fumbling physical encounters. Sex could be forgotten, or made into something that it wasn’t, but feelings were much harder to erase. There had been moments, from their time in Alexandria, when they had simply sat together talking quietly, or smoking cigarettes in […]

“Ordinary corrupt human love”: Graham Greene, The End of the Affair

I’m tired and I don’t want any more pain. I want Maurice. I want ordinary corrupt human love. Dear God, you know I want to want Your pain, but I don’t want it now. Take it away for a while and give it me another time. My local book club met Tuesday night to discuss […]

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