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Articles tagged with: greg waldmann

OLM Favorites: A Great and Sustaining Mystery

December 1st, 2017
OLM Favorites: A Great and Sustaining Mystery

Anthony Burgess the novelist had dreams of being a composer. He had little success, but along the way he delved deep into the nature and meaning of music.

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

July 1st, 2016
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

As the haze and heat of summer kick into full swing, the folk of Open Letters break out their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

Our Year in Reading 2015

December 1st, 2015
Our Year in Reading 2015

In the course of the year, many, many books cross the paths of OLM’s editors, and the end of the year is a natural time for reflecting on that endless stream. Our editors each pick a book from their year-in-reading that stood out from the rest.

The Broken Clock

November 1st, 2015
The Broken Clock

Controversial former Vice President Dick Cheney and his journalist daughter Liz have written a book claiming that the exceptional nature of American power is being sullied and squandered by the current occupant of the White House. Greg Waldmann reviews Exceptional.

Our Year in Reading 2014

December 1st, 2014
Our Year in Reading 2014

Our unabashedly bookish editors and friends look back on some of the highlights from 2014’s reading.

Title Menu: 10 Great “Minor” Works by Major Writers

August 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 10 Great “Minor” Works by Major Writers

The great writers of the ages were hardly (often) one-hit wonders. In praise of diversity, the staff at OLM celebrate the lesser-known b-sides of some pretty well known pens.

Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

July 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 12 Hot Summer Reads

It’s summer at last, and you won’t find any relief from the heat in our editors’ round-up of the hottest books they know.

“There Is No Enjoyment in This Life”

April 1st, 2014
“There Is No Enjoyment in This Life”

Iraqi lawyer and former exile Zaid al-Ali writes a bleak, sobering account of the state of his homeland in the post-“Mission Accomplished” era – but is there any reason for hope?

Policy Papers: Ukraine and the Left

March 8th, 2014
Relief_of_the_Light_Brigade

Russia and the West, talking past each other, have blundered into conflict over Ukraine. Some commentators on the American left aren’t behaving much differently.

A Disproportionate Response

February 1st, 2014
Andrew_Sullivan

For years, pioneering blogger Andrew Sullivan was one of the most vocal supporters of the war in Iraq. Time and the war’s wretched progress gradually forced him to change his thinking, however, and a new collection of his writings on the subject charts the disillusioning step-by-step.

Our Year in Reading 2013

December 1st, 2013
Our Year in Reading 2013

In this annual retrospective, the Open Letters team looks back on the highlights of our 2013 reading.

Quick, Off the Mark

November 1st, 2013
Quick, Off the Mark

Campaign books have short shelf-lives – and they deserve them, since most of them have about as much introspection as yesterday’s racing form. Greg Waldmann reads a recent book on the pivotal 2012 U.S. presidential election.

Summer Reading 2013

July 1st, 2013
Summer Reading 2013

In our annual feature, the Open Letters team offers suggestions for summer reading that take you off the beaten path of blockbusters and beach novels.

Summer Reading 2013 continues

July 1st, 2013
Summer Reading 2013 continues

In part two of our seasonal feature the Open Letters staff recommends another trove of unconventional books – and a few old favorites, too.

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

July 1st, 2013
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

Our feature continues, as more Open Letters folk share their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

Failing Gracelessly

May 1st, 2013
Failing Gracelessly

The authors have invaluable sources in America’s ‘deep state’ of surveillance and counter-terrorism, but how much secrecy does security justify? And what happened to moral accountability?

Book Review: Into the Desert

April 29th, 2013
Book Review: Into the Desert

It has become conventional wisdom to say that the first Gulf War was one of necessity, while the second was one of choice–but a collection of reflections challenges that maxim

Charles Rosen, 1927-2012

December 16th, 2012
Charles Rosen, 1927-2012

Open Letters mourns the loss of Charles Rosen, pianist, scholar, teacher and critic.

Our Year in Reading 2012

December 1st, 2012
Our Year in Reading 2012

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2012.

Our Year in Reading 2012 Continues

December 1st, 2012
Our Year in Reading 2012 Continues

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2012.

The Evolutionary: Barack Obama’s First Term in the White House

November 1st, 2012
The Evolutionary: Barack Obama’s First Term in the White House

Four years ago, Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency on a platform of hope and change. This month, as he fights for re-election, Greg Waldmann takes a detailed look at the incumbent’s first term.

A Hostage Worth Ransoming

September 1st, 2012
A Hostage Worth Ransoming

Who’s at fault for our disastrous politics — both parties? Not a chance, say Washington insiders Ornstein and Mann. Our resident politico fisks their analysis.

We Could Have Beaten Kennedy…

August 1st, 2012
LBJ-RFK-JFK

Lyndon Johnson rained destruction on Vietnam and championed civil rights, amassed a secret fortune and fought for the needy. His paradoxical life continues in the fourth volume of Robert Caro’s epic biography.

LOL, SRSLY?

May 1st, 2012
LOL, SRSLY?

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow has made a career of joking about easy political targets – so what happens when she tries to deliver a factual inquiry of a serious subject? Nothing funny, as Greg Waldmann discovers.

Good Enough

April 1st, 2012
Good Enough

A new book takes readers back to a time when, according to historian Ira Shapiro, politics could sometimes be noble and senators could sometimes be giants.

Shore to Shore

March 1st, 2012
ewilson

For two generations, the great American critic and man of letters Edmund Wilson has been instructing and delighting his readers – and inspiring some of them to become critics themselves.

Romney After Florida

February 1st, 2012
Romney_2011_Paradise_Valley,_AZ

After a brutal six months, Mitt Romney has won Florida and almost certainly the GOP nomination. Democrats and Republicans are rightly focused on his record, but they’re each doing it for the wrong reasons.

The Apparatchik

February 1st, 2012
condoleezza-rice

For two terms, first as National Security Advisor and then as Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice was the most – often the only – likeable face of the George W. Bush administration. But does this quintessential team player break ranks in her new memoir?

Sentimental Education

January 1st, 2012
Sentimental Education

Though most people don’t understand musical notation or the theory underlying it, nearly all classical music writing relies on it. Today, the initiate has a better option: YouTube.

Our Year in Reading

December 1st, 2011
narrow-road-to-the-interior-paperback-book

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2011

Our Year in Reading Goes On

December 1st, 2011
festhitler

More highlights from our 2011 reading

A Heartbeat Away

November 1st, 2011
Dick Cheney

John Nance Garner famously referred to the vice presidency as being not worth a bucket of warm, er, spit – and yet, during the two terms of George W. Bush, Dick Cheney used that office to wield unprecedented power. The former vice president writes an unapologetic memoir.

Summer Reading 2011

July 1st, 2011
hbo-rome-2

In this year’s special feature, our team of avid readers offered some suggestions for books a little off the beaten path of summer blockbusters.

Summer Reading 2011 Goes On

July 1st, 2011
lindbergh

More of this year’s special feature, where we offered some less predictable ideas for books to tuck into your beach tote or suitcase.

A False Quarrel

March 1st, 2011
Sari Nusseibeh

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict seems depressingly intractable, an impasse without end. A new book offers a hypothetical solution, but is it foolish idealism, unworkable pragmatism – or a desperately innovative kind of hope?

Duel

January 1st, 2011
Duel

Nixon’s crimes are known to us all. A new book reveals that his biggest tormentor in the media committed a few of them himself.

How, Not If

July 1st, 2010
How, Not If

The so-called Tea Party would like to dump President Obama in Boston Harbor – but even ordinary politicians often misunderstand him. The reasons are simpler than you think.

Playing the Shadow Game

February 1st, 2010
first_intifada

Since the days of T.E. Lawrence, reporters have been providing the West with carefully-wrought (or overwrought) tales of the Middle East. A new book comments on the excesses–and maybe commits a few too.