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Articles tagged with: Poetry Review

So Much Bastard Beauty

July 1st, 2016
So Much Bastard Beauty

A lovely rural landscape is seen throught urban-trained eyes in Ada Limon’s poetry collection Bright Dead Things. David Nilson reviews.

Interior, with Music

April 1st, 2016
Interior, with Music

The tension between the material and the abstract creates the complex music that threads through Ben Mazer’s new volume of poetry, The Glass Piano.

Not One to Eschew the Everyday

October 1st, 2015
Not One to Eschew the Everyday

From the tension between candor and formal presentation, Daniel Brown fashions the moments of discovery that comprise his new volume of poetry, What More?.

Moving at the Speed of Love

September 1st, 2015
Moving at the Speed of Love

Poet Alex Caldiero’s Some Love is tangled in the poetic complexities of love, and yet, as reviewer Scott Abbott discovers, the poems here can be every bit as fleshy and uncomplicated as the real thing.

The Only Relevant Thing

March 1st, 2015
The Only Relevant Thing

Matthew Lippman’s third poetry collection sings of the joys and sorrows of married life – and ventures onto broader societal stages as well. The result shows the reader in new detail a world they thought they knew.

Grudge Sliver

February 1st, 2015
Grudge Sliver

In Alice Fulton’s new book Barely Composed, her poems flash across the whole of the language, whip it into a froth, playfully distort it, and sometimes bypass it altogether. Open Letters‘ Poetry Editor reads along.

I Think We’re Alone Now

November 1st, 2014
I Think We’re Alone Now

Two poetry volumes – one concerned with how to be ourselves, alone, inside, the other concerned with making multifacted connections with external reality – are reviewed in a gentle dialogue with each other.

An Unfolding Elegy

November 1st, 2014
An Unfolding Elegy

When sudden death claimed poet Jake Adam York at the age of 40, it cut short his life’s work of commemorating all the martyrs of the American Civil Rights movement; Teow Lim Goh re-reads the man and his work.

Tempus Fugit

June 1st, 2014
Tempus Fugit

Maxine Kumin, friend of Anne Sexton, master of poetic form and meter, died just before her eighteenth book was published. Maureen Thorson dives into her allusive, welcoming last poems.

Tell Me Something I Don’t Know

April 1st, 2014
Tell Me Something I Don’t Know

Two new books of poetry take different approaches to the written word and its conundrums. Can words express the truth, or are we asking too much of them?

Office Space

February 1st, 2014
Office Space

When we read poetry, we want the transcendence of art: how is that compatible with being at work? A new collection of poems explores the possibilities.

Thousands of Grids

December 1st, 2013
Thousands of Grids

Building on his previous work, in New Poems Ben Mazer tries to find a balance between structure and fluidity.

Connect the Dots

October 1st, 2013
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What kind of reader would she be, our Poetry Editor asks, if she didn’t allow herself to be susceptible to Ange Mlinko’s sublime, piercing unreason?

Home, Where the Art Is

August 1st, 2013
Home, Where the Art Is

In “Belmont,” Stephen Burt, poet of Boston’s byways, offers readers verses that so court the senses as almost to confound them, shifting from technical confidence to unstructured questioning. As Kirsten Kaschock writes, “Burt attempts in these pages what Shylock did not dare” …

August 2013 Issue

August 1st, 2013
August 2013 Issue

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July 2013 Issue

July 1st, 2013
July 2013 Issue

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Second Glance: Reticent Confessional

July 1st, 2013
Second Glance: Reticent Confessional

Hospital visits, supermarket checkouts, and casseroles – the odd, unassuming verse of Jenny Bornholdt might leave some critics wondering if it’s actually poetry at all. Critic Stephen Akey says her work is intimate yet reserved – and warns us not to expect The Duino Elegies.

Rending the Familiar

May 1st, 2013
Rending the Familiar

Shane Book’s evocative collection Ceiling of Sticks shows us our familiar world in ways that might surprise even the most jaded reader into optimism about poetry.

“A Crystal Stranger Taking Off Their Mask”

May 1st, 2013
“A Crystal Stranger Taking Off Their Mask”

Constructing a “walrus itself” is a difficult thing to do – but it’s just one of the transubstantiations Ben Mirov attempts in his latest collection of poems

Point of Origin

March 1st, 2013
Point of Origin

“He said he would have Crispin Glover play him in a movie”–Alejandro Ventura’s image-rich and always funny poetry is on full display in Puerto Rico. Joe Betz reviews.

Truth be Told: On Natasha Trethewey

February 1st, 2013
Truth be Told: On Natasha Trethewey

Poet Laureate Natasha Tretheway mines American history–the early colonies, slavery, the Civil War–for the material of her poetry. Teow Lim Goh visits with the figures she’s brought back to life.

Nothing To Do With Dante

December 1st, 2012
Nothing To Do With Dante

Kathleen Rooney’s poems in Robinson Alone can be read two ways–as standalone pieces and as connected parts that form a single poetic narrative of a character’s life

Wabbit-hunting

November 1st, 2012
Wabbit-hunting

In sparse and contrapuntal verse, familiar words are warped out of their comfortable meanings, and sharpened to juxtapose – but is Joyelle McSweeney’s latest experiment a success?

Songs of Experience

October 1st, 2012
AMadrid

Sufi mystics, barbaric yawps, and the comedy of the sexes are what’s inside Anthony Madrid’s new collection of ghazals. What does our poetry editor make of this puzzling Persian pattern?

Talking about Hats, and Maybe Goats

October 1st, 2012
Talking about Hats, and Maybe Goats

Emily Pettit turns nonsense into horse sense, or goat sense, in her new collection Goat in the Snow

‘By hunger I mean more’

September 1st, 2012
fengsunchen

Myth and fairy tale seem as far from true as can be, but Feng Sun Chen’s poetry uses them to explore the necessities and unavoidable transformations of life.

Today He Wrote Something

August 1st, 2012
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Matvei Yankelevich’s poetry may seem direct and plainspoken, but as a new collection shows, his verse reveals a long battle with the uncertainty of language.

Good in the Good Sense: Antonio Machado

August 1st, 2012
camposdecastilla

The great Antonio Machado loved his native Spain and was disgusted by its descent into fascism; that fusion of enchantment and grief vivifies his unforgettable poetry.

Humane to Hornets: The Poetry of James Schuyler

July 1st, 2012
afewdays

The verses of the neglected poet James Schuyler seem to ramble, but they don’t really ramble; they seem dishevelled, but they aren’t; they seem miniaturist, but they contain whole worlds. Stephen Akey makes the case for your renewed attention.

Bad for You

May 1st, 2012
collossus

Known as much for how she exited her life as for the poetry she wrote during it, Sylvia Plath remains a polarizing figure in the world of verse. What are we reading, when we subject ourselves to her poems?

City Zen

February 1st, 2012
kateSchapira

How should we relate to our cities? To ourselves? Kate Schapira couldn’t be asking more important questions in her latest collections of poems, How We Saved The City, and The Bounty: Four Addresses

Recognizably Human: Larkin and the Sentimental

February 1st, 2012
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Nobody would accuse the mature Larkin of being a greeting card poet, and yet a warm and even vulnerable sentimentality bubbles up in his verse, often when it’s least expected.

Disembodied Embodiment

October 1st, 2011
oliver

The late Akilah Oliver’s poetry uses language to escape the trap of consciousness–verse “as rapture, as rupture” alike

“Signs of the Real”

October 1st, 2011
GinaMyers

Between the abstract and the solid, between Michigan and New York City, in and out of love, Gina Myers brings betweeness to the fore in her first collection of poems

Changeable Camelion

September 1st, 2011
Painting Poet John Donne

Courtier and cleric, adventurer and ascetic, man of faith and man of the world — John Donne was many things in his life, and a sprawling new Companion does its best to assess them all.

All the Questions

August 1st, 2011
clbecker

In her new collection of poems, Claire Becker probes the matter between what we intuit and what we learn, between what we choose and how we change.

Primal Mysteries

June 1st, 2011
swithering

In his latest collection, The Wrecking Light, Robin Robertson blends the voices of generations of Scottish/Celtic bards and balladeers into his own unique style of poetry.

Taxonomy and Grace

April 1st, 2011
nep

Have bickering bloggers and academic jargon so infected the poetry world that readers can no longer read a poem, or speak of one, as what it is?

Elemental Edge

April 1st, 2011
Adamantine

Shin Yu Pai engages with history, tradition, and the world around her in her new collection of poems.