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Articles tagged with: Sam Sacks

OLM Favorites: Seer Blest

December 1st, 2017
FormsofAttentionKermode

Frank Kermode consumed all of the tumultuous 20th century’s literary theories without being consumed by them. A look at the work of this wisest of secular clerics.

The Tools We Need

March 1st, 2017
The Tools We Need

In times of crisis, what good are books, exactly? Two explorations of the virtues of reading and writing make the hard sell for literature’s continued relevance.

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

July 1st, 2016
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012

As the haze and heat of summer kick into full swing, the folk of Open Letters break out their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

Both Sides, Now

March 1st, 2016
Both Sides, Now

If everybody’s a critic, as New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott claims in his new book, then where does that leave criticism? Sam Sacks reviews.

Our Year in Reading 2015

December 1st, 2015
Our Year in Reading 2015

In the course of the year, many, many books cross the paths of OLM’s editors, and the end of the year is a natural time for reflecting on that endless stream. Our editors each pick a book from their year-in-reading that stood out from the rest.

James Wood and the Fall of Man

December 1st, 2014
James Wood and the Fall of Man

Book critic James Wood is a fascinating collection of contradictions: an apostate true believer, a champion of experimental fiction, an earnest searcher in empty temples. Sam Sacks reads one of our foremost readers.

Our Year in Reading 2014

December 1st, 2014
Our Year in Reading 2014

Our unabashedly bookish editors and friends look back on some of the highlights from 2014’s reading.

Title Menu: 10 Great “Minor” Works by Major Writers

August 1st, 2014
Title Menu: 10 Great “Minor” Works by Major Writers

The great writers of the ages were hardly (often) one-hit wonders. In praise of diversity, the staff at OLM celebrate the lesser-known b-sides of some pretty well known pens.

Absent Friends: Lean Years of Plenty

June 1st, 2014
Absent Friends: Lean Years of Plenty

For a little over two years, shortly before she died, short story master Katherine Mansfield wrote a weekly book review column. Those pieces not only shed light on Mansfield’s particular slant of genius, but have much to say about the embattled art of reviewing.

Title Menu: Twoo Wuv

February 1st, 2014
Title Menu: Twoo Wuv

February would be unremittingly bleak if it weren’t for the excuse it gives us to ponder the meaning of love, that many-splendored thing. Our editors offer up their favorite literary treatments.

Title Menu: Books and Birth

January 1st, 2014
Title Menu: Books and Birth

Sam Sacks midwifes a new feature into existence with a list of books containing memorable scenes about childbirth.

Our Year in Reading 2013

December 1st, 2013
Our Year in Reading 2013

In this annual retrospective, the Open Letters team looks back on the highlights of our 2013 reading.

Eternal Blazon

November 1st, 2013
Eternal Blazon

Led on by a “shared obsession,” a philosopher and a psycyhoanalyst have teamed up to offer their interpretation of Hamlet. With the ghosts of countless critics looming before them, how has this pair fared?

Joseph and his Brothers

September 1st, 2013
Joseph and his Brothers

To many the scriptural story of Joseph is ancient and arcane. But its exploration into divine and authorial omniscience make it seem powerfully contemporary.

Summer Reading 2013

July 1st, 2013
Summer Reading 2013

In our annual feature, the Open Letters team offers suggestions for summer reading that take you off the beaten path of blockbusters and beach novels.

Summer Reading 2013 continues

July 1st, 2013
Summer Reading 2013 continues

In part two of our seasonal feature the Open Letters staff recommends another trove of unconventional books – and a few old favorites, too.

From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

July 1st, 2013
From the Archives: Summer Reading 2012 Continues

Our feature continues, as more Open Letters folk share their annual Summer Reading recommendations!

Real Full Rich Rank

December 1st, 2012
Real Full Rich Rank

Respectable novelists are solemn, meditative, and deliberate–they certainly don’t churn out book reviews every week. Anthony Burgess smashed that fussy mold and left us a lifetime’s work of brilliant, omnivorous literary journalism.

Our Year in Reading 2012

December 1st, 2012
Our Year in Reading 2012

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2012.

Our Year in Reading 2012 Continues

December 1st, 2012
Our Year in Reading 2012 Continues

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2012.

Our Year in Reading

December 1st, 2011
narrow-road-to-the-interior-paperback-book

In this special feature, we look back at some highlights of the reading we did in 2011

Our Year in Reading Goes On

December 1st, 2011
festhitler

More highlights from our 2011 reading

Love at First Glans

September 1st, 2011
Vox

Nicholson Baker’s provocative new book is an attempt at mainstream literary pornography, but does it suffer from the same performance anxiety as other novelistic efforts to depict sex?

Summer Reading 2011

July 1st, 2011
hbo-rome-2

In this year’s special feature, our team of avid readers offered some suggestions for books a little off the beaten path of summer blockbusters.

Summer Reading 2011 Goes On

July 1st, 2011
lindbergh

More of this year’s special feature, where we offered some less predictable ideas for books to tuck into your beach tote or suitcase.

Astonish Us

May 1st, 2011
Astonish Us

Pauline Kael is out of print today and perhaps known best for the enemies she made. But any immersion into her passionate, intelligent writing shows her to have been one of the best movie critics–or critic of any kind–of the past century.

Young Jew Telling Jokes

January 1st, 2011
Cohen-Joshuahp

Assimilation is the nightmare of Joshua Cohen’s daring novel “Witz,” and the book is therefore designed to be strange and prickly to the gentiles who try to read it.

A Certain Perturbation

July 1st, 2010
robinsonyale

In Absence of Mind, Marilynne Robinson explores both the dynamics of faith and the complacency of recent anti-faith screeds. But is her own book something of a fall from grace?

Book Review: How I Became a Famous Novelist

August 17th, 2009
stevehely

Steve Hely’s How I Became a Famous Novelist tells the tale of a writer/’content manager’. Steve Donoghue reviews.

Review of The Signal

August 8th, 2009
9780143117551

“You always felt time as a tangible heartbeat in the mountains. The days were short.” Dive into Ron Carlson’s novel, The Signal, by starting with this review by Sam Sacks.

Review of An Expensive Education

August 6th, 2009
9780802118936

In his review of An Expensive Education, Sam Sacks unearths the vast geopolitical conspiracies being hatched in Nick McDonell’s Harvard.

Book Review: Lowboy

March 22nd, 2009
lowboy

John Wray’s Lowboy enters the New York subway system. Steve Donoghue follows it.

Book Review: Delicate Edible Birds

February 13th, 2009
delicateedible

Lauren Groff’s Delicate Edible Bird is a story collection packaged for women readers but of interest to any reader

Book Review: The Holy City

January 4th, 2009
holycity

Patrick McCabe’s new novel imagines the life of Irish playboy Christopher McCool. Sam Sacks reviews The Holy City.

Microreview: Tierra del Fuego

December 22nd, 2008
tierradelfuego

Francisco Coloane’s collection of short stories takes readers into little-visited corners of southern Chile. Sam Sacks reviews Tierra del Fuego.

Book Review: Palace Council

June 11th, 2008
palacecouncil

Stephen L. Carter’s Palace Council occupies the rarefied territory of the 1960s Harlem elite. Sam Sacks reviews.

Book Review: Peace

May 26th, 2008
PeaceBausch

Richard Bausch takes his talents to Italy in World War II. Sam Sacks reviews Peace.

Book Review: God’s Middle Finger

April 5th, 2008
Godsmiddle

Richard Grant take a trip to the hellhole of the Sierra Madre a (barely) lives to tell about it

Book Review: The Blue Star

March 13th, 2008
Bluestar

Tony Earley’s sequel to Jim the Boy is as rich and powerful as its predecessor. Sam Sacks reviews The Blue Star.

Book Review: The Reserve

February 27th, 2008
reserve

Russell Banks pens a Lost Generation fairy tale. Sam Sacks reviews The Reserve