‘I’m the Top Goddess – How Could I Fail to Make Trouble?’

‘I’m the Top Goddess – How Could I Fail to Make Trouble?’

Renowned classicist and historian Peter Green has at last produced a translation of the Iliad – and it comes with its own Greek Chorus. Steve Donoghue investigates.

The Great Blacksby

The Great Blacksby

If Richard Pryor had spent time in the ghettos of L.A. County and had any interest in writing a novel, he might have come up with a book like Paul Beatty’s The Sellout: a beautifully offensive meditation on riches and race.

Second Glance: Fatal Beauty

Second Glance: Fatal Beauty

Nothing shakes up the literary establishment like women writers — or women readers — who won’t stay quietly in their place.

The Schizophrenic Prophet

The Schizophrenic Prophet

A sumptuous new Library of America volume contains a rich sampling of the work of Reinhold Niebuhr – whom reviewer Robert Minto refers to as “the premiere establishment theologian of the 20th century.”

The Atrium Effect: Museums Under Glass

The Atrium Effect: Museums Under Glass

Big slabs of glass may look impressive, but they have a serious effect on our interaction with art. Museums are changing, and it isn’t always a good thing.

A Cycle of Horrifying Songs

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Schubert’s bleak, tumultuous song cycle, Winterreise, is the subject of tenor Ian Bostridge’s passionate new book. Greg Waldmann examines Schubert’s Winter Journey, and the trouble with hard-to-love classical music.

“Are You Living or Dead?”

“Are You Living or Dead?”

Usually Kazuo Ishiguro’s narrators implicate us in their world, reminding us of all we have in common. But in his new novel we are strangers looking at an unrecognizable landscape.

Reading Poetry

Reading Poetry

From Wallace Stevens to Seamus Heaney to Jorie Graham, the latest collection of critical pieces by Helen Vendler celebrates the worth of a wide array of writers. Jack Hanson reviews The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar.

In the Flesh

In the Flesh

Into an unremarkable marriage comes a major disruption: the wife stops eating meat. Suddenly, everything in their usually orderly world goes out of control.

Hectic Hyperborea

Hectic Hyperborea

Michael Pye’s new book provides a rich history of the North Sea in human culture – and pokes holes in some crass nationalist myth-making along the way. Matt Ray reviews The Edge of the World.

It’s a Mystery: “The person with the secret is the person with the power”

It’s a Mystery: “The person with the secret is the person with the power”

Donna Leon’s 24th book starring the charismatic Commissario Guido Brunetti, Falling in Love, is every bit as spellbinding as we expect it to be. Martin Walker’s seventh featuring Bruno, Dordogne’s favorite chief of police, The Children Return, finds his small town shockingly targeted by a terrorist network.

From the Archives: Uppity Blues

From the Archives: Uppity Blues

Master of the mannered sneak-attack, Kazuo Ishiguro has enraptured readers for years – including Karen Vanuska, who walks us through Nocturnes, his collection of linked stories.

From the Archives: 2 poems by Gaius Valerius Catullus

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An original translation of two poems by Gaius Valerius Catullus.

From the Archives: Sentimental Education

From the Archives: Sentimental Education

Though most people don’t understand musical notation or the theory underlying it, nearly all classical music writing relies on it. Today, the initiate has a better option: YouTube.

From the Archives: Peer Review: Home

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Book reviewers were split on whether Toni Morrison’s novel is a further triumph or a falling off. Or did these critics only found what they anticipated? We reviewed the reviews, then we reviewed the book.