Starship Captains Do It On Impulse (Unfortunately)

Starship Captains Do It On Impulse (Unfortunately)

In fan-favorite Ernest Cline’s new book, a young man raised on video games and cheesy sci-fi movies finds that they just might be the key to Earth’s salvation. But is the 80’s nostalgia of Armada self-defeating?

The Edge of Sin

The Edge of Sin

Robyn Cadwallader centers her debut novel on a young nun who volunteers to be walled away from all human contact for the rest of her life. Such women existed and, surprisingly, their lives were enormously full.

“The Strangest Teens of All”

“The Strangest Teens of All”

The venerable concept of the superhero team dates back to 1940, but in 1975 Marvel Comics introduced a new team of X-Men – and an empire was born.

None of the Above

None of the Above

Political scientist Ian Bremmer’s new book looks at the changing nature of American power in the 21st century, but just how many false premises does the book employ?

Eileen Chang’s Changes: from Love in Redland to Naked Earth

Eileen Chang’s Changes: from <em>Love in Redland</em> to <em>Naked Earth</em>

Eileen Chang would never have written her hot-button anticommunist masterpiece Naked Earth without US Government encouragement and support. What should contemporary readers make of this?

“A Reputable Outlaw”

“A Reputable Outlaw”

Was the duel at twenty paces a cancer on civil society or a gesture of defiance and an expression of individuality? Touche: The Duel in Literature looks to provide the reader satisfaction on that question.

Painful to Nice Feelings

Painful to Nice Feelings

He sailed around Cape Horn and wrote a classic about it, and he fought for the downtrodden in Boston courts for thirty years – he was Richard Henry Dana, Jr., and he’s the subject of a thought-provoking new biography.

The Happy Misanthrope

The Happy Misanthrope

Milan Kundera’s newest and possibly final novel returns to the ideas he’s pursued across his career, including his “categorical disagreement with being.” Y. Greyman reviews.

It’s a Mystery: “It’s not important who fires the shot. It’s who pays for the bullet.”

It’s a Mystery: “It’s not important who fires the shot. It’s who pays for the bullet.”

From the Perigord region of France to North Yorkshire, England to the Appalachian Trail – the locations of this trio of new mysteries by old hands might be far-flung, but for our mystery maven, crime is a universal language!

From the Archives: Tom and Em

From the Archives: Tom and Em

It is said that Thomas Hardy fell deeply in love with his wife, Emma, only after she died. Stephen Akey revisits the stunning, elegiac poetry he wrote in her memory.

Summer Reading 2015: Cool Reads

Summer Reading 2015: Cool Reads

This year the staff and contributors of Open Letters Monthly recommend their summer reads with an unusual theme: the cold.

Summer Reading 2015, Part 2

Summer Reading 2015, Part 2

Our Summer Reading feature continues…