Neither Entirely Real Nor Imagined

Neither Entirely Real Nor Imagined

“The Wonderments” allow the hero of Bill Broun’s spellbinding debut novel Night of the Animals to talk to the animals in Regent’s Park Zoo. Justin Hickey reviews.

Suffer the Little Children

Suffer the Little Children

According to a new book, not only did God design life, but deep down inside, we all know it. Steve Donoghue remains unconverted.

Looking Back: Diane Arbus, Nan Goldin, and Robert Frank in New York City

Looking Back:  Diane Arbus, Nan Goldin, and Robert Frank in New York City

Diane Arbus’s photographs are weird. Their subjects are weird. She herself was weird. A new exhibit takes us back to the origins of that strangeness –and asks what it says to us now.

Patricide Deferred

Patricide Deferred

Stuart Jeffries has written the first truly accessible account of the Frankfurt School. Robert Minto reviews.

“Just Call Her ‘Tailleferre’”

“Just Call Her ‘Tailleferre’”

Even today, women composers still struggle for recognition. Michael Johnson explores the life and work of the unjustly forgotten Germaine Tailleferre.

The Limits of Courage: 50th Anniversary of Death and the Dervish

The Limits of Courage: 50th Anniversary of <em>Death and the Dervish</em>

2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Mesa Selimovic’s modernist Yugoslavian masterpiece; Pedja Jurisic looks at Death and the Dervish today.

Keeping the Faith, Keeping the Feast

Keeping the Faith, Keeping the Feast

The masterful essays in Gregory Wolfe’s The Operation of Grace range from Mel Gibson to Thomas More, from Annie Dillard to Christopher Hitchens. Martyn Wendell Jones reviews.

It’s a Mystery: “Rule to live by: no body, no death”

It’s a Mystery: “Rule to live by: no body, no death”

Computer wizardry in Minneapolis and sexual abuse in North Yorkshire: the latest gripping books from two veteran mystery authors.

From the Archives: One More, Please

From the Archives: One More, Please

It’s been years—too long!—since Martha Argerich has preformed solo. Greg Waldmann eagerly pours thorugh her new DVD and the history of her brilliant career for clues to her reclusiveness and for glimmers of hope.

From the Archives: I Am Almost a Camera

From the Archives: I Am Almost a Camera

As the Smithsonian’s new exhibit confirms, Richard Estes is the preeminent photo-realist painter of our time or–most likely–of any time. But to what extent is photo-realism an art worth practicing? And what does it do?