The Tools We Need

The Tools We Need

In times of crisis, what good are books, exactly? Two explorations of the virtues of reading and writing make the hard sell for literature’s continued relevance.

Over the Top

Over the Top

An ambitious new novel joins a long and illustrious parade of writers in telling the story of WWI as a tale of innocence lost.

A Year with the Tudors II: A Flash, a Thud, a Crimson Deluge

A Year with the Tudors II: A Flash, a Thud, a Crimson Deluge

Poor innocent Lady Jane Grey has been an ostentatious martyr to the Protestant cause for centuries; a new book tells her brief but familiar life story as continues.

Phantasm Banged Into Fact

Phantasm Banged Into Fact

Under Stalin, Socialist Realism drove the Soviet fabulists into obscurity from which writers like Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky are only now emerging.

Jubilant Cosmos

Jubilant Cosmos

The inimitable and meteoric Margaret Cavendish is the subject of a captivating new historical novel by Danielle Dutton.

Once Upon a Time in Kerala

Once Upon a Time in Kerala

A pivotal work of Indian literature, Chemmeen is both a romantic tale of star-crossed lovers and a stinging critique of women’s oppression.

“In Some Bright Place”

“In Some Bright Place”

Storyteller George Saunders has written his first novel. Lincoln in Bardo hits many of the old, familiar notes, but there is something new and unexpected as well.

Real News

Real News

At a time when the world of news is in unprecedented furore, David Halberstam’s classic book on the media deserves renewed attention and appreciation.

Lessons from History

Lessons from History

In the new novel from the author of The Historian, a young American woman travels across present-day Bulgaria and delves into the country’s dark past.

It’s a Mystery: “Truth doesn’t always come from truthful men”

It’s a Mystery: “Truth doesn’t always come from truthful men”

In two new thrillers – one starring a bitter spy brought back into the fold and the other starring a group of misfit cops – complicated forces converge to bring terrorism to the streets of London.

From the Archives: Marilynne Robinson’s Psalms and Prophecy

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This month our regular feature is devoted to a study of the small but potent canon of Marilynne Robinson. Sam Sacks dives back into her famous fiction and formidable essays.

From the Archives: Losing Music

From the Archives: Losing Music

“We can pour anything into it – any fear or catastrophe or yearning, any warning” – music both fills our lives and helps to shape them. But what happens if music starts, slowly, haltingly, to go away? A harrowing personal essay.

From the Archives: Solitude (I)

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a poem by Tomas Tranströmer, translated by Robin Robertson

From the Archives: Shore to Shore

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For two generations, the great American critic and man of letters Edmund Wilson has been instructing and delighting his readers – and inspiring some of them to become critics themselves.

From the Archives: Beyond the Pillars of Hercules

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In addition to their gods and goddesses, the ancient Greeks worshiped youth and athletic prowess, and their foremost bard was Pindar.

From the Archives: The Radicalism of Felix Holt

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Felix Holt, the Radical may be one of George Eliot’s least-read novels, but its questions about a democracy that puts power in the hands of “ignorant numbers” still have both moral and political resonance.