Occasional Fiction

Occasional Fiction

As a collection of stories about the complexities of marriage, Reader, I Married Him is good, sometimes even excellent. But how is it as a provocation to rethink Jane Eyre?

Second Glance: The Secret of Prometheus

Second Glance: The Secret of Prometheus

The oldest texts can seem familiar, but they repay attention with strangeness. Robert Minto delves into the religious origins and unresolved mysteries of Prometheus Bound.

A Period of Most Powerful Transition

A Period of Most Powerful Transition

In his world-ranging new popular history Heyday, Ben Wilson looks at the Great Exhibition of 1851 as a focal point of the 19th-century grand dream of commerce and culture. Zach Rabiroff reviews.

Atomic Turquoise Bat Mitzvah

Atomic Turquoise Bat Mitzvah

A startling alien legacy is dug up out of the ground in Sylvain Neuvel’s stellar debut novel Sleeping Giants. Justin Hickey reviews.

Change the Way They Live

Change the Way They Live

As Andrew Bacevich relates in his important new book, US involvement in the Middle East has been characterized by confusion, mistakes, and blundering military force. Greg Waldmann reviews America’s War for the Greater Middle East.

from To Duration

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a poem, translated by Scott Abbott

‘Yes, Yes, Yes!’

‘Yes, Yes, Yes!’

To be immortalized by Shakespeare is often also to be caricatured by him; a sumptuous new biography of King Henry IV admirably brings its royal subject out of the Bard’s shadow.

Simulacrum

Simulacrum

The intense problematics of Don DeLillo’s literary preoccupations are on full display in his latest, Zero K. Dan Green explores the legacy of an author’s postmodernism.

Second Glance: Njal’s Saga

Second Glance: Njal’s Saga

Njal’s Saga is a myth based on history, a narrative about the effect of religion on a culture of revenge. Matt Ray takes us to medieval Iceland.

From Some Mountain Summit High in the Air: Lord Acton and History

From Some Mountain Summit High in the Air: Lord Acton and History

History remembers him as the author of the famous dictum about power corrupting, but Lord Acton led an intense and fascinating life. Luciano Mangiafico tells his story.

It’s a Mystery: “Folly is like regret, it knows no limits”

It’s a Mystery: “Folly is like regret, it knows no limits”

Old loyalties lead to explosive new dangers in two new mystery-thrillers set in North Carolina and Northern Ireland.

From the Archives: Lizard on a Rock

From the Archives: Lizard on a Rock

He survived years of dangerous exile, won his crown on the battlefield, and founded one of the most famous dynasties in human history – and yet we still haven’t embraced Henry VII. A spirited biography seeks to change that.

From the Archives: DeLillo and the Three Ps

From the Archives: DeLillo and the Three Ps

The nation’s book critics naturally congregated when Don DeLillo’s Point Omega appeared. In an Open Letters Peer Review feature, John Rodwan supplies a scorecard for the players.